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How to Diagnose a Transaxle Problem

by Emile Heskey

Once of the first steps in diagnosing a transaxle problem is determining whether your car moves. The transaxle is the part of your vehicle that transfers power from the engine to the wheels. A major problem will result in your car remaining stationary. Problems with transaxles usually stem from the transaxle fluid, although more serious problems can result in having the transaxle replaced. This can be an expensive procedure, and so the transaxle should be regularly maintained.

Start your engine and attempt to move forward or backward. Do this slowly and be ready to catch the brakes. If your car will not move then you may have a problem with the transaxle. Leaving the engine running and allow your car to heat up for about 15 minutes.

Turn the engine off once the car has heated up. Lift the hood, and check the transaxle fluid. If it is at a low level or if it smells burnt, insert more fluid. Check the level on the gauge to determine if it is above the minimum level, although the gauge may be giving bad readings.

Fill the transaxle will transmission fluid, and allow the car to run again for about 15 minutes. Try to move the car as you did in step one. If it still will not move, and the noise from the engine is no different than usual, you will have to have your transaxle serviced. Turn the engine off, and do not attempt to drive your vehicle until it has been seen by a professional.

About the Author

Emile Heskey has been a professional writer since 2008, when he began writing for "The Journal" student newspaper. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in modern history and politics from Oxford University, as well as a Master of Science in Islamic and Middle Eastern studies from Edinburgh University.

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