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How to Decode a 1969 Camaro Vin Number

by Thomas West

The first Chevrolet Camaro was introduced as a 1967 model. The 1968 Camaro was changed very little, but the 1969 was restyled and had a more aggressive look. The 1970 Camaro was completely restyled and larger in almost every dimension than the 1969 model. The 1969 Chevrolet Camaro came with a 13-digit serial number that was embossed on a metal plate affixed to the forward edge of the driver's side dashboard panel and was visible through the windshield from the outside.

Observe the first character of your 1969 Camaro's vehicle identification number (VIN), which should be the numeral "1," indicating this is a VIN for a Chevrolet.

Check the second numeral of your VIN, which should be a "2" to indicate this is a VIN for a Camaro.

Check the third numeral of your VIN, with a "3" indicating your Camaro came with a six-cylinder engine, or a "4" indicating it came with an eight-cylinder engine.

Observe the fourth and fifth numerals of your VIN to determine if this is a coupe, indicated by "37," or a convertible, indicated by "67."

Observe the sixth numeral of the VIN, which should be a "9" for 1969 model year.

The seventh character of the VIN indicates the Camaro's assembly plant: "L" for Los Angeles, or "N" for Norwood, Ohio.

Check the last six digits of the VIN, which should begin with a "5" followed by the sequential number indicating the car's serial number.

Tip

  • The VIN can also be found stamped on certain body panels on the 1969 Camaro. By checking behind the heater box cover on the sheet metal firewall, the VIN should be visible. By checking under the cowl grille cover on the passenger side, a second stamping of the VIN can be found on the cowl.

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