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How to Change a Headlight on a 2001 Honda Accord

by William Pullman

The headlights on the 2001 Honda Accord, like virtually all headlights, have a limited lifespan and will eventually burn out. The 2001 Accord has separate high beam and low beam bulbs. You should replace either type of headlight immediately after it burns out to maintain your safety while driving at night or in inclement weather. The process for changing the headlights on four-cylinder Accords differs slightly from the way you change the headlights on six-cylinder Accords.

1

Open the hood of the Accord and pull the radiator reservoir and the air intake duct out of their mounting brackets on the passenger side of the vehicle if your Honda Accord is the four-cylinder model. Pull the radiator reservoir out of its mounting bracket on the driver's side if you own the six-cylinder model. These parts block access to the headlight assembly in the engine compartment and do not require any special tools for removal. Once they're removed, you will see an electrical connector attached to the back of the low-beam and high-beam headlights. The low-beam light is on the outside; the high-beam light is on the inside.

2

Squeeze the head of the electrical connector of the light you want to replace and pull away from the bulb to disconnect it from the headlight bulb.

3

Turn the headlight bulb a quarter turn to the left and pull out to remove it from the headlight assembly. Dispose of the headlight bulb after removing it.

4

Insert the replacement bulb into the headlight assembly and turn it a quarter turn to the right to secure it to the headlight assembly.

5

Plug the electrical connector into the bulb until you hear the click of the locking tabs.

6

Repeat Steps 2-5 with any remaining headlights that need to be changed.

7

Replace the radiator reservoir and air intake duct in their mounting brackets for four-cylinder engines; replace the radiator reservoir into its mounting bracket for six-cylinder engines.

Items you will need

About the Author

William Pullman is a freelance writer from New Jersey. He has written for a variety of online and offline media publications, including "The Daily Journal," "Ocular Surgery News," "Endocrine Today," radio, blogs and other various Internet platforms. Pullman holds a Master of Arts degree in Writing from Rowan University.

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