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How to Change Gear Oil in a CR250

by Chris Gilliland

They say that races are won by the amount of preparation you put into your bike before you even hit the track. Preparing your motorcycle beforehand can spell the difference in seeing the checkered flag or a dreaded DNF. A critical step in the preparation process is changing your CR250R's transmission -- or gear -- oil, which helps to protects the transmission and clutch from the stresses of competitive motocross riding. This is such an important procedure that Honda recommends changing the transmission oil every three races to reduce the possibility of a transmission failure while on the track.

1

Start your CR250R and left it idle for two or three minutes to warm the transmission oil. Stop the engine and place the CR250R on a stand to hold it in a level position. Let the oil settle and cool slightly for another minute.

2

Unscrew the oil filler cap from the top of the clutch cover on the right side of the engine, just in front of the kick-start lever. Place an oil drain pan below the engine.

3

Remove the drain bolt from the bottom of the engine, using a 16 mm socket and a ratchet. Remove and discard the crush washer from the drain bolt, and wipe the drain bolt threads with a rag. Let the transmission oil drain from the engine until the flow of oil reduces to a light drip.

4

Wipe the area surrounding the oil drain hole clean, Place a new crush washer on the drain bolt, then thread it into the engine by hand. Tighten the bolt to 18 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench.

5

Remove the oil level check bolt -- the only bolt with a Phillips-type head on the clutch cover -- using a Phillips screwdriver. Fill the transmission with Honda GN-4 SAE 10W-40 engine oil until a small amount of oil drains from the check bolt hole while the bike is level. Wipe the check hole clean and screw the check bolt into place. Tighten the bolt to 7 foot-pounds and screw the oil filler cap into place by hand.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

An avid motorcyclist, Chris Gilliland has immersed himself into the two-wheeled world while balancing work life and raising three daughters. When he is not managing the parts department of a local, multi-line motorcycle dealership, Gilliland can often be found riding, writing or working on his motorcycle blog, Wingman's Garage.

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