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How to Change the Gas Filter in a Buick Rendezvous

by Lee Sallings

Preventive maintenance on the Buick Rendezvous consists of regular fuel filter replacements and cleaning of the intake tract. The fuel filter is located in the rear of the vehicle, on the frame, near the fuel tank. Removal and replacement is well within the capabilities of the average home mechanic. This procedure requires only typical hand tools.

Raise and support the back end of the vehicle, using the floor jack and jack stands. Placement of the jack stands is very important. Place them securely on the frame out of the way of the work area but in a position to support the vehicle safely. Every year people are injured or killed by vehicles that fall off a jack. Jack stands prevent this.

Relieve the pressure in the fuel tank by loosening the fuel filler cap. Then loosen the flare type fitting on the fuel filter with the metric wrenches and catch any fuel in a drain pan. Allow the fuel to drain for a few minutes to avoid getting fuel on you while you finish removing the filter.

Release the quick-disconnect fitting on the filter by pushing in on the fuel line while you squeeze the release tabs. When the tabs click and release, then pull the line off the filter. Remove the flare type fitting that was loosened in Step 2, and remove the bolt holding the filter bracket to the frame.

Remove the old filter from the bracket and insert the new filter in the bracket. Start the nut on the flare fitting into the new filter, but do not tighten it. Bolt the bracket and filter to the frame and plug the quick-disconnect fitting on to the new filter by pushing until it clicks into place. Tighten the flare fitting.

Lower the vehicle off the jack stands with the floor jack, and then carefully lower the vehicle to the ground. Prime the filter by turning the ignition key to the run position for 2 seconds and then back to the off position. Do this twice and start the vehicle. Check the new filter for leaks and test-drive if no leaks are found.

Items you will need

About the Author

Lee Sallings is a freelance writer from Fort Worth, Texas. Specializing in website content and design for the automobile enthusiast, he also has many years of experience in the auto repair industry. He has written Web content for eHow, and designed the DIY-Auto-Repair.com website. He began his writing career developing and teaching automotive technical training programs.

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