How to Change Edelbrock Carburetor Jets

by John Stevens

Edelbrock carburetors are most commonly associated with high-performance engines, but they can be used for everyday driving. An Edelbrock carburetor contains four jets. These jets help determine how much fuel enters the carburetor. Changing the jets is often required to tune the carburetor for abnormal conditions, such as high altitude or humidity. Changing the jets typically takes only about 5 minutes.

Remove the metering rods and step-up springs. On both sides of the top of the carburetor is a brass-colored plate, approximately one inch in diameter. These two plates conceal the metering rods and step-up springs. Remove the single screw that holds each plate in place with a Phillips-head screwdriver, then lift the plates off of the carburetor. With the plates removed, the metering rods and step-up springs will be visible. A single metering rod and step-up spring is located underneath each cover plate. Grasp the top of the metering rod with needle-nose pliers, then lift the rod out of the carburetor. The springs attached to the rods are the step-up springs. The rods and springs are therefore removed as a single unit.

Disconnect the choke cam connecter rod from the carburetor. The choke cam connecter rod connects the throttle linkage on the driver's side of the carburetor to the body of the carburetor. Two rods attach to the throttle linkage. The choke connector rod is the rod at the top of the linkage. The rod is held in place with a clip. Pull the clip off of the end of the rod with needle-nose pliers, then pull the rod out of the throttle linkage.

Disconnect the pump connecter rod from the carburetor. The pump connector rod connects the throttle linkage on the driver's side of the carburetor to the body of the carburetor. Two rods attach to the throttle linkage. The pump connector rod is the rod at the bottom of the linkage. The rod is held in place with a clip. Pull the clip off of the end of the rod with needle-nose pliers, then pull the rod out of the body of the carburetor.

Remove the eight screws from the airhorn with a flathead screwdriver, then lift the airhorn off of the body of the carburetor. The airhorn acts as a lid to cover the internal components of the carburetor.

Remove the carburetor jets. There are a total of four jets. Two jets are located within the inside of the passenger's side of the carburetor, and two jets are on the driver's side. Each jet is approximately a quarter of an inch in diameter. A slot runs through the center of each jet, which makes the jets look like a standard screw. Insert the tip of a flathead screwdriver into the center of each jet, then unscrew the jet with the screwdriver.

Insert the replacement jets into the body of the carburetor, then tighten each jet into place with a flathead screwdriver.

Lower the airhorn onto the top of the carburetor, then install and tighten each of the airhorn's eight screws with a flathead screwdriver.

Insert the tip of the pump connector rod into the bottom of the throttle linkage, and the tip of the choke cam connector rod into the top of the linkage. Secure each rod in place with its clip.

Lower each metering rod and step-up spring assembly into position within the carburetor, then lower the brass-colored plates over the assembly. Tighten the single screw that holds each plate in place with a Phillips-head screwdriver.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

John Stevens has been a writer for various websites since 2008. He holds an Associate of Science in administration of justice from Riverside Community College, a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice from California State University, San Bernardino, and a Juris Doctor from Whittier Law School. Stevens is a lawyer and licensed real-estate broker.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Motor - Hot Rod image by Jeffrey Zalesny from Fotolia.com