How Can I Tell If a Windshield Is Defective?

by Jen Davis

Your car's windshield is made of two pieces of safety glass that have a plastic laminate layer in between them. On occasion, a car is manufactured with a defective or flawed windshield. Often, you will not realize your windshield is defective until you have a problem with the windshield or it breaks and has to be replaced. If you suspect your car has a defective windshield, there are several signs that you should look for.

Look for flaws in the windshield. If the windshield appears wavy, uneven or to have wrinkles in it, its likely that glass is defective. Defective windshields should be replaced immediately because they are weaker than normal windshields and more prone to incur damage due to normal use.

Check the area around your windshield for leaks. If your windshield is slightly flawed, is not exactly the right size or has been improperly installed, your windshield may not fit the car properly. If your windshield does not fit the car properly, there is a good chance it will leak when it rains or the car goes through a high-pressure car wash. Take a vehicle with a leaking windshield in for repair immediately, as water can damage the inside of your car.

Look for cracks or other signs of damage on your windshield. All windshields are susceptible to damage from flying rocks and debris, but if your windshield is very easily damaged or cracks without a perceptible cause, your windshield may be defective.

Warning

  • close A damaged or defective windshield should be replaced as soon as possible. It can weaken your car in the event of an accident.

About the Author

Jen Davis has been writing since 2004. She has served as a newspaper reporter and her freelance articles have appeared in magazines such as "Horses Incorporated," "The Paisley Pony" and "Alabama Living." Davis earned her Bachelor of Arts in communication with a concentration in journalism from Berry College in Rome, Ga.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera sur la route image by valérie Beunardeau from Fotolia.com