How to Bleed a Toyota's Power Steering

by Jule Pamplin

Bleeding the power steering fluid is crucial procedure that falls under the category of Toyota preventative maintenance. Forcing the air from the power steering fluid supply in a Toyota vehicle will ensure that the steering operation performs in a manner expected from the driver. Inconsistencies in the performance of power steering can prove dangerous. Bleeding the power steering fluid can be performed by an auto mechanic at a service station or can be performed by a less experienced Toyota owner for a fraction of the price.

Place the lifting jack beneath the frame of the Toyota and lift the vehicle until the tires are clear of the road surface.

Lift the hood of the Toyota and locate the power steering bleed valve on the right side of the engine compartment. Place a clear tube over the bleed valve. Place a drip pan beneath the tube to catch any expelled fluid.

Remove the lid to the power steering fluid container and place a funnel into the container.

Start the Toyota.

Open the power steering bleed valve with a 13mm wrench.

Turn the steering wheel to the left and then to the right, causing the fluid to flow from the bleed valve through the tubing.

Pour power steering fluid into the fluid reservoir as the old fluid is expelled.

Continue to add new fluid to the reservoir as the old fluid is expelled until the stream of fluid from the bleed valve contains no air bubbles.

Tighten the bleed valve with the wrench and remove the tubing.

Fill the power steering reservoir to the "hot full" line with power steering fluid.

Lift the vehicle to remove the jack stands and then lower the Toyota to the ground. Close the hood.

Tip

  • check Enlist help from an assistant to turn the steering wheel while you monitor the flow of fluid from the bleed valve.

Items you will need

About the Author

Jule Pamplin has been a copywriter for more than seven years. As a financial sales consultant, Pamplin produced sales copy for two of the largest banks in the United States. He attended Carnegie-Mellon University, winning a meritorious scholarship for the Careers in Applied Science and Technology program, and later served in the 1st Tank Battalion of the U.S. Marine Corps.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera hand on steering whell image by Andrzej Borowicz from Fotolia.com