How to Adjust KYB AGX Struts

by Russell Wood

It used to be that if you wanted to adjust the ride in your vehicle for firmer handling on the track or a softer ride on the road, you had to manually replace all your shocks for the specific application. But now, with advances in technology, shocks can be adjusted for different ride conditions depending on your need, with just the twist of a knob. KYB has a line of shocks named the AGX series, and they are fully adjustable depending on your desire. You can adjust them in under 10 minutes for the entire vehicle, with minimal tools.

Lie down on the ground next to a tire on your car, and use the flashlight to locate the shock on the suspension. The KYB AGX shocks are red. Depending on which model vehicle you have, the shock should have a black numbered knob on the body for adjustment. If it doesn't have this knob, skip to Step 3.

Turn the knob with your hand to your desired ride control setting. The knob has numbers from 1 to 9 on the dial, and there is a black arrow on the body of the shock pointing at the knob to indicate which number on the dial is active. The lower the number, the softer the ride will be. Numbers 1 to 3 are the softest settings; 4 to 6 are medium range for track use or mild handling improvements; and 7 to 9 are the stiffest modes, best for race launching, high-end handling improvements and a harsher ride. Repeat this process for any other struts on the vehicle with this configuration.

Pop the hood or open the trunk, depending on which portion of the vehicle you're working on, and locate the top of the strut. There will be a colored, numbered dial on the middle of the shock body, which allows you to adjust the strut. There is a flat-head screwdriver slot in the middle of the shock shaft, right on the top. Place the flat-head screwdriver in the center of the strut on the slot, and turn it toward the higher numbers on the dial for a firmer ride, or toward the lower numbers for a softer ride. The stages go from 1 to 4, with 1 being a soft, comfortable ride, and 4 being a firm ride for handling. Repeat this process for any other struts on the vehicle with this configuration.

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About the Author

Russell Wood is a writer and photographer who attended Arizona State University. He has been building custom cars and trucks since 1994, including several cover vehicles. In 2000 Wood started a career as a writer, and since then he has dedicated his business to writing and photographing cars and trucks, as well as helping people learn more about how vehicles work.