1989 Chevy Silverado Specs

by Julie Duncan

Since 1918, Chevrolet has been an industry leader in its production of popular pickup trucks. With its long history of manufacturing pickup trucks, Chevrolet has had several models of trucks enter the automotive market, from the C/10 and Cheyenne to the S10 and Silverado. In 1989, Chevrolet marketed the C/K 1500 half-ton truck in regular and extended cab. Chevrolet did not give the C/K 1500 the name Silverado until 1999.

Exterior Features

The height of the 1989 Chevrolet C/K 1500 ranged from 70.4 inches for the regular cab with 6.5-foot bed and extended two-wheel drive to 73.9 inches for the regular cab with 8-foot bed and extended four-wheel. The length of the truck ranged from 194.1 for the regular cab with 6.5-foot bed and two-wheel drive, to 236.9 inches for the extended cab with 8-foot bed and four-wheel drive. The width was 76.4 inches for both the regular and extended cab. The 1989 Chevrolet C/K 1500 also came with two doors.

Interior Features

The interior of the 1989 C/K 1500 had a seating capacity of three. The headroom in the truck was 40 inches, the shoulder room was 66 inches and the legroom was 41.7 inches.

Safety Features

In 1989, safety features in vehicles were basically non-existent. Head and side air bags were not available, and stability and traction control technology was not implemented. The only standard safety feature available on the 1989 Chevrolet C/K 1500 was the anti-lock brake system.

Engine

The 1989 Chevrolet C/K 1500 was powered by a 4.3-liter V6 engine. The engine had an output power of 160 horsepower and 235 foot-pounds of torque. The bore and stroke was 4.00 inches by 3.48 inches, and the compression ratio of the engine and fuel injection system on the 1989 C/K 1500 was 9.3:1. The vehicle also came standard with a four-speed automatic transmission.

Fuel Data

The gas tank on the 1989 Chevrolet C/K 1500 held 25 gallons of unleaded gas. With its 25-gallon tank, the four-wheel-drive truck got 16 miles per gallon in the city and 20 miles per gallon on the highway. The two-wheel-drive truck had only slightly better fuel efficiency with 17 miles per gallon in the city and 22 miles per gallon on the highway.

About the Author

Julie Duncan has worked in the legal profession for over 15 years as a paralegal, owner of a court reporting business and now a law graduate. She was also recognized for her research and writing by the South Carolina Political Science Association in 2006.

Photo Credits

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