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1979 Chevy Truck Specs

by Tom Lutzenberger

The designs of the 1979 Chevy trucks were shared with all truck models beginning from 1973 until 1987. While first heralded as going cheap, because of the use of non-metal/non-fabric interior furniture, the trucks in fact held up for very long periods of services with reliable performance.

Features on All Trucks

The 1979 models continued the styling changes on all manufactured trucks by the company. The design provided essentially a bigger truck with a squarish shape and significant passenger cabin room versus models from earlier decades. Two-tone color designs were a common offering with truck packages sold by Chevy dealers. High-end models came with wood grain inserts inside the truck cabin, while basic interior furniture consisted of plastic and vinyl. The antennae system was incorporated into the windshield and the window glass was shaped, rather than flat, as in earlier trucks.

Six-cylinder engines were available in either 250- or 292-cubic inch size. These lower-end machines came stock in C-10 and K-10 trucks. Their torque produced 175 and 225 lbs. per foot of pull at 2,000 revolutions per minute at 100 horsepower. The eight-cylinder engines came in three sizes ranging from 307-cubic inches, producing 115 horsepower, to a 454 model producing 240 horsepower. The torque produced ranged from a bottom performance of 205 lbs. moved per foot at 2,000 revolutions per minute to 355 lbs. per foot at 2,800 revolutions per minute.

C-Series Trucks

The C-series continued to be set apart as a truck model line by the two-wheel drive design in the engine. The truck bed reached almost 7 feet long with vehicle space coverage of 117 1/2 inches from end to end in size. Long-bed models reached as much as 8 feet. And a half-ton model was produced that could hold up to six passengers.

K-Series Trucks

The K-series trucks incorporated four-wheel drive as their predecessors with the same name. The K-series truck bed and length was the same size as the C-series truck. And the K-series also included the addition of a half-ton model.

About the Author

Since 2009 Tom Lutzenberger has written for various websites, covering topics ranging from finance to automotive history. Lutzenberger works in public finance and policy and consults on a variety of analytical services. His education includes a Bachelor of Arts in English and political science from Saint Mary's College and a Master of Business Administration in finance and marketing from California State University, Sacramento.

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