1962 Ford Ranchero Specifications

by John Stevens J.D.

The Ford Ranchero was a combination passenger car and pickup truck. The vehicle was first produced in 1957 and sold as its own model. From 1960 until 1964, the Ranchero was offered under the Falcon's model designation. The Ranchero was designed to compete with compact import cars. For this reason, the 1962 model's engine selection was limited to only small six-cylinder types and sold for a base price of $2,298.00.. The Falcon Rancheros are still prized by collectors.

Dimensions and Weight

The 1962 Ranchero is 181.1 inches long, with a wheelbase length of 109.5 inches. The vehicle is 70.6 inches wide and 56.3 inches high. The front tread is 55 inches in width, and the rear is 54.5 inches. The 1962 Ranchero's curb weight is 2,559 pounds.

Engines

The standard engine in the 1962 Ranchero is a 144-cubic inch six-cylinder. The 144 has a bore and stroke of 3.50 inches by 2.50 inches and a compression ratio of 8.7:1. The 144 produces 85 horsepower and 134 ft.-lbs. of torque. A larger 170-cubic inch, six-cylinder engine was offered as an option. The 170 has a bore and stroke of 3.50 inches by 2.94 inches and a compression ratio of 8.1:1. The 170 generates 101 horsepower and 165 ft.-lbs. of torque.

Brakes and Suspension

The Ranchero has drum brakes on both the front and the rear. Each drum measures 9 inches in width. A single parking brake is operated by a cable that runs down the length of the vehicle from the interior. Disc brakes were not available on the 1962 model. The front suspension consists of a pair of independent ball joints and two coil springs. Longitudinal leaf springs are used in the rear suspension.

Capacities

The Ranchero has a 14-gallon fuel tank. Its transmission holds 3.5 quarts of fluid, and the cooling system holds 2.25 pints of coolant. The rear differential stores 2.5 pints of lubricant.

Optional Equipment

The 1962 Ranchero was available with an optional Ford-O-Matic automatic transmission and a 170-cubic inch, six-cylinder engine. Power steering and a push-button radio were also optional features for the 1962 model-year.

References

About the Author

John Stevens has been a writer for various websites since 2008. He holds an Associate of Science in administration of justice from Riverside Community College, a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice from California State University, San Bernardino, and a Juris Doctor from Whittier Law School. Stevens is a lawyer and licensed real-estate broker.