How to Troubleshoot an Overheating Toyota Engine

by Brooke Julia

The normal temperature of a Toyota engine while running should be between 195 and 220 degrees Fahrenheit, and must remain consistent for optimum performance and gas efficiency. Overheating decreases your fuel economy and can cause serious damage to the engine. Pistons, rods, bearings and gaskets are just a few things vulnerable to overheating. Boiling coolant can ruin the radiator and hoses. Never ignore a high temperature reading on the dash gauge.

Make sure your thermostat is working properly. Crank the engine and feel the top radiator hose. As the engine heats up, the thermostat will open to relieve the heat, causing the radiator hose to become uncomfortably warm to the touch. If the hose does not become hot, the thermostat isn't opening.

Check your coolant levels. Low coolant means the engine isn't able to protect itself from overheating properly. Use the right mixture of coolant and low-mineral water, never pure antifreeze.

Check for coolant or water leaks. Top off your coolant and start your engine until it reaches normal operating temperature. Turn on the air conditioning and go for a short drive. Stop and inspect the radiator, water pump and hoses for leaks. Don't remove the radiator cap while the engine is hot.

Inspect your radiator for signs of corrosion or blockage. Dirty radiators are worth repairing. Severely corroded radiators should be replaced. Consider buying a stronger, more durable (and more expensive) radiator.

Check all belts and hoses. Hoses should be firm and open. Collapse, cracks, bulges and soft spots are serious signs of deterioration. Belts should hold firm tension and show no signs of fraying or breaking.

Take a look at your brakes. A parking brake that won't release or a brake caliper sticking can cause your engine to work too hard to overcome the resistance.

Tips

  • check Check the temperature gauge itself if you find no problems to indicate overheating--your gauge may simply be faulty.
  • check Overworking your vehicle can cause the engine to run hot. Excessive driving, climbing uphill for a length of time or pulling weight not meant for your car puts a strain on your engine.

About the Author

Brooke Julia has been a writer since 2009. Her work has been featured in regional magazines, including "She" and "Hagerstown Magazine," as well as national magazines, including "Pregnancy & Newborn" and "Fit Pregnancy."

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera Girl repair car on road image by Vasyl Dudenko from Fotolia.com