How to Size Car Speakers for a Car

by Robert Ceville

In addition to having to replace your car's stock stereo, adding an amp and subwoofer box, you'll have to replace the door and rear speakers as well. Before you can go out and start purchasing them based on sound alone, you need to know how to measure them first. The holes that they fit in are size-specific, and just any speaker size will not do. Getting accurate measurements does not take very long at all.

Use the panel removal tool to remove the studs that are holding the door's panel in place. Once the door panel has been removed, you will see that the speaker is attached to the frame of the car door.

Use the measuring tape to determine the size of the speaker by running it from one side of the cone to the other. Also measure the distances from each of the screws across from each other as well. This measurement will be the size needed for replacing your door speakers.

Reassemble the door panel, placing each stud back into its original place.

Open the trunk of your car. You will see the back portion on the speakers, which will be sufficient for measuring the speaker.

Use the measuring tape to find the distances between the multiple placement screws, and the size of the speaker cone itself. This will give you the size needed to replace the rear speakers as well. Now that you have the proper measurements, you can begin to seriously look at some of the better options that are available to you.

Tip

  • check You also can visit the link to Crutchfield's website. There you can enter the make and model of your car, then be taken to the appropriate speaker sizes for your car. This is a much simpler method, but there is no guarantee that the information is accurate and up to date. The only way to be sure is to measure the speakers yourself.

Items you will need

About the Author

Based in Florida, Robert Ceville has been writing electronics-based articles since 2009. He has experience as a professional electronic instrument technician and writes primarily online, focusing on topics in electronics, sound design and herbal alternatives to modern medicine. He is pursuing an Associate of Science in information technology from Florida State College of Jacksonville.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera speaker image by CraterValley Photo from Fotolia.com