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How to Replace the EGR Valve on a Lincoln Town Car

by Don Bowman

The Lincoln Town Car's EGR is on the rear of the engine, on the passenger side. It is attached to the side of the intake manifold and has a metal pipe running down to the exhaust manifold. This pipe induces exhaust gas to the EGR. There are two vacuum hoses on the metal EGR pipe that go to a BPFE valve. The valve senses the back pressure in the exhaust system and operates the EGR valve.

1

Unplug the low-pressure sensor on the air-conditioning line at the accumulator so it doesn't get broken. Disconnect the hose from the coolant reservoir, using a pair of pliers to take the clamp off, to give more room to work.

2

Look down the passenger side of the engine between the exhaust manifold and the fender well to see the EGR pipe connection. Loosen and remove the 1-inch nut that is threaded onto the manifold, using a wrench.

3

Follow the metal pipe up to where it is connected to the EGR valve. Loosen and remove the connection to the valve, using a wrench. Remove the two vacuum lines and extract the pipe from the vehicle. Remove the two bolts securing the EGR to the intake manifold, using an 8 mm socket. Pull the EGR away from the manifold and retain the gasket.

4

Clean the hole in the intake manifold if it is blocked with carbon, using a screwdriver. Check the BPFE hoses that run to the EGR pipe. They are notorious for blocking and causing the EGR to malfunction and set a code stating "EGR valve has insufficient flow." To do this, pull the two hoses off the valve itself and look into the hoses for buildup. Remove the hoses, clean them out and then replace them.

5

Spread anti-seize compound on the pipe connections. Install the new EGR and components in reverse order of removal.

Items you will need

About the Author

Don Bowman has been writing for various websites and several online magazines since 2008. He has owned an auto service facility since 1982 and has over 45 years of technical experience as a master ASE tech. Bowman has a business degree from Pennsylvania State University and was an officer in the U.S. Army (aircraft maintenance officer, pilot, six Air Medal awards, two tours Vietnam).

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