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How to Replace a Catalytic Converter in a Honda

by Jeffrey Caldwell

The catalytic converter on a Honda is an emissions component located in the exhaust system. A catalyst inside the catalytic converter combines unburned hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide with oxygen to create carbon dioxide. If the catalytic converter melts it can cause extreme back pressure in the exhaust system, leading to poor performance. Rust in the catalytic converter can also lead to exhaust leaks.

Removing the Catalytic Converter

Raise the vehicle according to instructions listed in the owner's manual and support with jack stands.

Spray the retaining bolts with a penetrating oil such as WD-40. There are five bolts that connect the catalytic converter to the exhaust pipes: two in the front and three in the back.

Remove the bolts that connect the front of the catalytic converter to the head pipe.

Remove the bolts that connect the rear of the catalytic converter to the exhaust pipe.

Remove the catalytic converter from the vehicle.

Installing a Catalytic Converter

Coat the threads of the retaining bolts with an anti-seize compound.

Raise the catalytic converter into position between the head pipe and exhaust.

Install the bolts that connect the rear of the catalytic converter to the exhaust pipe, but do not tighten.

Install the bolts that connect the front of the catalytic converter to the head pipe.

Tighten the bolts.

Lower the vehicle.

Tip

  • Spray the bolts once with penetrating oil the night before you intend to remove the catalytic converter and then once again one hour before you begin.

Warning

  • The catalytic converter becomes extremely hot while the engine is operating. Do not attempt to service the catalytic converter immediately after turning off the engine. Always follow the instructions listed in the owner's manual when lifting and lowering a vehicle. Failure to do so could result in injury or death.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Jeffrey Caldwell has been a freelance writer for over five months and has published over 250 articles on websites like eHow and Trails.com. Caldwell writes articles on a wide range of topics including travel, camping and automotive mechanics. He has a Bachelor of Arts in English from Millersville University.

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Photo Credits

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