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How to Replace a Crank Angle Sensor in Holden Commodore

by Kyle Sanstrom

The crank angle sensor in a Holden Commodore is part of an extensive network of sensors, designed to assist the powertrain control module, or PCM, in operating the engine. The crank angle sensor provides the PCM with positional information about the crankshaft. A faulty crank angle sensor can prevent the engine from starting. Replacement crank angle sensors are available from automotive-parts stores, licensed Holden dealerships and online parts retailers.

Park the Commodore on a flat surface and turn off the engine. Engage the emergency brake and pop open the hood. Allow the vehicle to cool for at least one hour.

Place wheel chocks behind the rear wheels and lift the front of the vehicle using an automotive jack. Lower the vehicle down onto jack stands and remove the jack.

Crawl underneath the engine and locate the crank angle sensor. It is in the center of the engine block, between the firewall and the engine. It is made from black plastic and has a two-wire connector attached to it.

Disconnect the sensor's electrical connector and remove the bolt holding the sensor to the engine block using a 3/8-inch ratchet and a metric socket. Remove the sensor from the block using a twisting/pulling motion.

Install the new sensor into the block using a twisting/pushing motion. Reinstall the sensor's retaining bolt and reconnect its electrical connector.

Raise the front of the vehicle using the automotive jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the vehicle to the ground. Start the engine and verify that it operates properly.

Warning

  • Exercise extreme caution whenever you raise and lower a vehicle. Never crawl underneath a vehicle when it's only being supported by a jack. Make sure the jack stands are secure before beginning any work under a vehicle.

Items you will need

About the Author

Kyle Sanstrom has been writing professionally since 2008. His articles have been published on several websites including eHow and Automobile Insight. Sanstrom has undergone advanced automotive training at the Dunwoody College of Technology, holds an Associate of Arts in general studies from Century College and has more than 10 years of experience in all aspects of automotive repair and diagnosis.

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