How to Remove Waterspots From a Car Windshield

by S.F. Heron

Water spots can form on car windshields in much the same manner as spots appear on glasses, shower tiles and shower doors. Hard water concentrates the minerals within the water as it evaporates, forming a ring where the water droplet existed. These annoying spots on the windshield of your car aren't easily removed with your windshield washer fluid and wipers. Many spots defy removal with regular car washing, creating an annoying mark in your field of vision when driving. Sprinklers, rain and incomplete car washing often result in water spots covering your windshield.

Mix a solution of two parts distilled water and one part white vinegar. Soak a rag in the mixture and place the wet cloth directly on the water spots on your windshield. Allow it to sit for about five minutes, then rub the windshield lightly. Continue soaking and applying the solution to the window until the hard water spot is removed. Make sure the rag is completely dirt-free to prevent scratching the windshield. Use full-strength vinegar for stubborn spots.

Sprinkle a light amount of Bon Ami cleanser on the windshield. Work the solution into the water spots using a soaking wet sponge. Bon Ami is gentle enough to prevent scratches on the glass. Don't substitute any other cleaner for Bon Ami since similar cleaners, such as Comet, will scratch your windshield.

Wet the windshield with water and clean the window vigorously with crumpled newspaper. The paper absorbs the water and is slightly abrasive to help remove water spots.

Mix a solution of one part isopropyl alcohol and two parts distilled water. Soak a rag in the solution and place it on the window for 5 to 10 minutes to remove water mineral deposits from the glass. Use a soft cloth to remove the spots completely. Apply alcohol full-strength for stubborn water spots.

Apply a product such as RainX to protect the windshield from future hard water deposits. Also make sure not to park near sprinklers, and protect your car from acid rain if you can.

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