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How to Remove Mildew From Golf Cart Seats

by Don Kress

During long-term storage, you may find that the seats of your recreational golf cart have begun to form mildew. While this doesn't damage the seat itself, it can produce an unpleasant odor and come off on your clothes. Fortunately, mild cleansers such as bleach will not affect the vinyl seat surface and, with a small amount of scrubbing, will loosen and remove all traces of the mildew from both the seat cushion and the seat back.

1

Position the golf cart in an open area where you can work without the fumes from the bleach causing you any discomfort. Put on rubber gloves to protect your hands and safety glasses to guard against getting bleach in your eyes. You may also wish to wear old clothes to ensure that you don't damage good pants or shirts.

2

Dilute 2 cups of bleach with 4 cups of warm water in the bucket, and then soak the rag in the diluted mixture.

3

Scrub the vinyl seats of the golf cart with the diluted bleach mixture. It will take a few minutes of scrubbing, but the bleach will kill the mildew and release it from the vinyl. You may also notice that the seat will lighten a bit. This is the warm water removing excess dirt and dust from the vinyl, not a discoloration due to the bleach.

4

Wipe the cleaned seat with a clean, dry rag to remove any traces of the diluted bleach mixture, then place the golf cart in the sun to completely dry out any of the mixture that may have seeped into the seam between the seat base and the seat pad.

Warning

  • Do not use the bleach full strength unless the mildew is severe. While it won't damage the vinyl, the smell may permeate the cushion and remain with the golf cart for several weeks after you have cleaned it.

Items you will need

References

About the Author

Don Kress began writing professionally in 2006, specializing in automotive technology for various websites. An Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certified technician since 2003, he has worked as a painter and currently owns his own automotive service business in Georgia. Kress attended the University of Akron, Ohio, earning an associate degree in business management in 2000.

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