How to Remove Jeep Liberty Brake Rotors

by Jody L. Campbell

So you want to remove the brake rotors from your Jeep Liberty. Not only will this save you a significant amount of money on labor charges at your local service station, it will also give you a sense of purpose by homing in on your do-it-yourself repairs. Replacing the rotors on a Liberty is fairly simple and, even if it's front rotors you're removing or if you have rear disc brakes and want to remove the rear rotors, the procedure is exactly the same. You'll need some tools, some technical savvy and a level head to make this project safe and simple.

How to Remove Jeep Liberty Brake Rotors

Park the Jeep Liberty on a flat, level paved or concrete surface. Apply the parking brake and release the hood latch.

Place a wheel chock behind a wheel of the opposite axle you intend to lift. Open the hood and suck out half the fluid from the master cylinder using the turkey baster. Don't borrow mom's from the kitchen and put if back after, either. They make these for shop use or if you do use a kitchen one, mark it for shop use and buy mom a new one for Thanksgiving. Replace the cap on the master cylinder for now.

Break the lug nuts loose from the tire(s) you're going to be removing. Just break them loose and do not loosen them too much and do not remove them.

Lift the wheel of the side you want to replace with the floor jack in a safe and secure area. Place the jack stand in a safe and secure place, preferably on the frame rail if possible. If you are removing both rotors to have them machined and need them both at the same time, lift both sides of the axle. If not, you can lift one side at a time.

Remove the lug nuts and wheel.

Remove the caliper bolts using the ratchet and socket. Pry the caliper off using the large screwdriver, remove the pads clipped to the caliper using the screwdriver as leverage, and squeeze the piston of the caliper in with the C-clamp. Support the caliper to the frame or coil spring with the bungee cord; do not allow the caliper to hang from the brake hose. Re-clip the pads into the caliper.

Cut off the retainer rings (if present) on the hub of the rotor. There will be two of them and they will be threaded onto two of the lug studs and hold the rotor to the hub. You do not need these to reinstall the rotors, so you can cut them off with a pair of dikes.

Remove the rotor. If the rotor does not separate from the hub, this is most likely due to rust and corrosion buildup between the hub and the interior of the rotor. Depending on what you're doing with the rotor will dictate how delicate you have to be removing it. If you're replacing the rotor with a new one, use a hammer to shock the rotor by striking the fin with force. Continue to until the rotor breaks free. If you're removing the rotor to have it machined or plan to reuse the rotor, use a heavy rubber mallet instead so you do not damage the rotor.

To install or replace the rotors, reverse the procedure. If you're replacing the rotors, clean off the new ones with brake cleaner spray to remove the coating from the inside and outside of them. Wipe clean with a rag. It is also recommended that you tighten all bolts and lug nuts to proper torque specifications, which you can obtain from the owner's manual, using the adjustable torque wrench and socket.

Pump the foot brake pedal when you're done and the Liberty is back on the ground to restore hydraulic pressure to the caliper pistons. Failure to follow this step will result in dangerous and hazardous conditions. Adjust the brake fluid level of the master cylinder only after you've pumped the foot brake pedal and only add clean DOT-approved brake fluid for the Jeep Liberty.

Items you will need

About the Author

Jody L. Campbell spent over 15 years as both a manager and an under-car specialist in the automotive repair industry. Prior to that, he managed two different restaurants for over 15 years. Campbell began his professional writing career in 2004 with the publication of his first book.