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What Is a Normal Reading for the Oil Gauge?

by Mike Schoonveld

The normal oil pressure in an internal combustion engine varies from one brand to another and one model to another. What's normal for a Chevrolet engine may be different for a Toyota engine and the normal pressure for a 4.3L Chevrolet may be different than on a 5.7L Chevrolet motor. Still, oil pressure is an important monitor of how well the engine oil is protecting the moving parts of an engine.

Mid-Range is Best

Oil pressure will vary in most engines depending on whether the engine has just been started and the oil is cool or if the motor has run long enough to warm to normal operating temperature. The pressure will vary somewhat with the speed the engine is turning. That's why many vehicles only have gauges that show low, normal and high ranges. Check the specifications for the exact make and model engine for your vehicle to determine the correct oil pressure operating range in pounds per square inch. Gauges that register in PSI, usually range from 0 to 100 and the normal zone on these is between 20 and 80 PSI.

Considerations

The oil pressure gauge measures the resistance to the oil being pumped through the engine by the motor's oil pump. The temperature of the oil, the type of oil and it's viscosity all affect that resistance. The age of the engine affects oil pressure, as well. New, tight engines will register higher oil pressures than the same engine thousands of miles later after it has been broken-in and has experienced some internal wear.

Low Verses High

Low oil pressure indicates insufficient lubrication is being provided to the motor. A reading less than 20 PSI or under the normal range on the gauge is cause for immediate attention. The problem could be as simple as a low oil level or a signal of serious engine problems. High oil pressure readings are uncommon and may be a faulty gauge or an improperly functioning oil by-pass valve.

About the Author

Mike Schoonveld has been writing since 1989 with magazine credits including "Outdoor Life," "Fur-Fish-Game," "The Rotarian" and numerous regional publications. Schoonveld earned a Master Captain License from the Coast Guard. He holds a Bachelor of Science in wildlife science from Purdue University.

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