How to Magnetize a Screwdriver Using a Car Battery

by Russell Wood

Cars and trucks house hundreds of tiny screws. You may find that sometimes as you loosen a screw, it can be virtually impossible to remove it unless the screwdriver is magnetic. Although you can buy a dedicated magnetic screwdriver, you might not have access to one when you need it. Fortunately, you can make your own regular screwdriver magnetic by using a few basic components.

Strip 1 inch of shielding off each end of the wire using the wire strippers. Pop the hood of the vehicle and locate the battery. If you have a loose car battery available, place it on a surface where you can work on it.

Wrap the wire tightly around the metal shaft of the screwdriver, leaving approximately 1 foot of wire at each end.

Hold one end of the wire to the positive terminal. Hold the other end your hand, making sure to hold on to the insulated part. Quickly tap the wire against the negative terminal for a fraction of a second. Repeat at least 5 times.

Remove the wire from the screwdriver and test to make sure that it is magnetic.

Warning

  • close Do not keep the wire touching the negative terminal for more than an instant. Do not touch the bare wire while current is running through it.

Items you will need

About the Author

Russell Wood is a writer and photographer who attended Arizona State University. He has been building custom cars and trucks since 1994, including several cover vehicles. In 2000 Wood started a career as a writer, and since then he has dedicated his business to writing and photographing cars and trucks, as well as helping people learn more about how vehicles work.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera screwdriver image by bluefern from Fotolia.com