How to Kill Roaches in a Car

by Robin McDaniel

If your car has been overrun by roaches, it may be almost impossible to eliminate them by just cleaning the vehicle alone. Roaches can live for long periods without eating, and once they have moved in, it is difficult to get them to leave.

Choose a time when you have two or three days when you will not need to use your car. You will need to wait for a day or two after treatment before you drive your car.

Get rid of any debris or foodstuff that may be in your vehicle. Take everything out of the trunk. If you have child seats, remove them from the car and take the cushions out and wash them.

Vacuum your car thoroughly. Pay special attention to the creases in the seats where food tends to accumulate.

Park your car is outside in a well-ventilated area. Place a roach bomb in your car, preferably in the middle. Place another bug bomb in your trunk. Set the bomb off in your trunk first, and then set the bomb off in the interior. Lock the car so no one can enter during this process.

Place a large piece of plastic over your vehicle so the majority of the bug poison will stay in the car. Secure the plastic to the ground or tires with duct tape.

Leave the bug bomb to work for the period suggested in the instructions, and add on two more hours to ensure the roaches are dead.

Open the car and roll down all the windows. Let the car air out for at least 4 to 5 hours.

Vacuum the car again, and clean all surfaces using a sanitizing cleanser. Vacuum the seats well. To remove bug bomb residue, consider renting an upholstery cleaner or take the car to be professionally cleaned.

Repeat this process every week or two over a period of two of months to eliminate all eggs. If you have successfully removed the food source, the roaches will likely find somewhere else to go.

Tip

  • check If you park your car in a garage, you will need to follow the steps (minus the tenting) to bomb the garage as well. For best results, do not allow food in the car once roach removal has been accomplished.

Warning

  • close Have the seats cleaned, to eliminate any bomb residue, before allowing children back in the car.

Items you will need

About the Author

Robin McDaniel is a writer, educator and musician. She holds a master's degree in higher educational leadership from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton as well as a bachelor's degree in elementary education. She is pursuing a Ph.D. in adult in community education. McDaniel enjoys writing, blogging, web design, singing and playing bass guitar.