Thinking about purchasing a new car? Use our new Car Loan Calculator to estimate your monthly car payment!

How to Replace Wheel Studs on Chevrolet Cars

by Contributing Writer; Updated June 12, 2017

A Chevrolet car is a luxury workhorse that is as likely to be driven to a restaurant as it is to be found breaking trails through the woods. While the Chevrolet car is designed to withstand the stress of either kind of driving, the wheel studs can strip or become so metal fatigued that they will fail. You can replace wheel studs on a Chevrolet car in an afternoon. Making sure that your studs can do their part of the job will help prevent accidents or overheating your wheel bearing while driving your Chevrolet car.

Under The Hood:

 How to Replace Wheel Studs on a Chevy Tahoe

Park your Chevy Tahoe on a level surface. Use a lug wrench to loosen the lugs on the tire you want to begin working on. Don't remove the lug nuts, just break them loose.

Raise your Chevy Tahoe on a tire jack. Once the tire is off the ground, place jack stands under the vehicle and lower the vehicle onto the stands and remove the jack. You never want to work on a vehicle that is raised on a tire jack. Jacks can collapse easily while you are working. Always use jack stands to support the weight of the raised vehicle. Once the Tahoe is supported by the jack stands, remove the lug nuts on the tire and then remove the tire itself.

Remove the top bolt holding the brake caliper in place over the wheel drum with a socket wrench. Once the bolt is removed, lift the entire caliper unit off the drum and lay it behind the wheel on the bearing housing to keep it out of the way.

Wedge two-by-four wood blocks between the wheel drum and the bearing housing behind it. Use C-clamps to hold the drum, wood and bearing housing together so the drum cannot move. The wood placed between the drum and bearing housing will protect the bearings and tie rods from the force of the blows that will be necessary to remove the studs.

Spray each wheel stud with a penetrating lubricant spray. A spray like WD-40 is ideal and almost every store carries it, but other brands of spray will work just as well. Tap the stud with the back of your socket wrench after you have sprayed it. This will send a vibration along the length of the stud that will help to work the spray through the stud hold and loosen any rust. Wait five minutes before going on to the next step so the penetrating lubricant has time to work.

Remove the wheel studs. Wheel studs are only inserted though a hole in the wheel drum. They are not threaded into place. Hit the wheel stud with a mallet until it comes out the back side of the wheel drum. Avoid using a metal hammer as this can "mushroom" the top of the stud and you will not be able to get it out. If you absolutely have to use a hammer, hold a piece of two-by-four over the top of the stud and strike the wood. This will prevent you from damaging the stud.

Insert the replacement studs by pushing them through the stud holes in the drum from the back of the drum. The threaded ends of the wheel stud should be facing out towards you. Put a metal washer over each wheel stud and put the lug nut on it. Use a torque wrench to tighten the lug nut to the proper torque for your size bolt (the size will depend on the drums on your Tahoe, see Resources). Once you have hit the correct torque, remove the lug nut and the washer. This will set your wheel stud into your drum, the washer was used only to protect the surface of the drum from the torque tension on the lug nut. Replace your tire and tighten the lug nuts. Lower your car back to the ground and repeat these steps for each tire.

Items you will need

  • Lug wrench

  • Tire jack

  • Jack stands

  • Socket wrench

  • Two-by-four wood blocks

  • Large C-clamps

  • Penetrating spray lubricant (like WD-40)

  • Mallet

  • Metal washers

  • Torque wrench

 How to Replace a Wheel Stud in a Chevy Impala

Purchase a new stud. You need the same size stud when you replace the wheel stud on your Chevy Impala. There's an alternative, shorter stud made by GM that you can use to make insertion easier.

Check in your trunk under the spare tire for the jack and jacking tools. You need to make sure you block the tires when you jack up the vehicle.

Raise the Impala on the jack and then remove the wheel. Take off the caliper but leave the brake line on it. Use a wire to hold it and don't let it hang by the brake line. Remove the rotor. The rear brakes are either disc or drum. If you have drum brakes, remove the drum.

Feel behind the hub to see if there's a spot where there's adequate room to remove the stud and line the stud up with the space. If there's no room, you either need to remove the hub and use a vise to remove the stud, or saw off the stud and replace it with a shorter one.

Smack the stud with a hammer to drive it out the back. If you sawed it off, you may need to put a rod on the stud and smack the rod. Pull the stud out the back and push in a new one.

Use wheel bolts to tighten down the stud. Put them on the stud with the angle outward. As you tighten these down, they pull the stud through the hole. Check the back and stop when you see the head flat against the hub. Use an impact wrench if you have one to make the job easier

Remove the bolts that you put on when you replaced the wheel stud on the Impala. Put the assembly back on in the reverse order and tighten down the wheel nuts.

Items you will need

  • Jack, lug wrench and jack tools

  • Blocks

  • Replacement stud

  • Vise-grips

  • Open end wrench

  • Crescent wrench

  • Dead blow hammer or heavy mallet

  • Extra wheel bolts and wheel nuts

  • Impact wrench (if available) or 1/2-inch long handled drive socket wrench

 How to Replace a Wheel Stud in a Chevy Silverado

Purchase a new stud for your truck. When you replace the stud on the Silverado, you need the same size stud. GM does make a shorter one that does the job, as long as the width is the same. Take the stud with you to the store if you don't know the size.

Look behind the passenger's seat in the regular cab Silverado for the jack and jacking tools. They're under the second row seat on the passenger's side on the extended and crew cab.

Jack up the truck. Some models have disc brakes in the rear and others have drum brakes. If the stud is on a wheel with disc brakes, remove the caliper without disconnecting the brake line and hang it from mechanic's wire. Take off the rotor. Remove the drum for drum brakes.

Check behind the wheel hub and see if you can find the head of the stud. If you can, or if you find an opening to line up the stud, skip to Step 5. Otherwise, you need to remove the hub, or get one of the shorter stud replacements and cut off the end of the stud to remove it.

Whack the stud on the end with a mallet to drive it out. If you cut it off, you may need to put a rod on the stud and strike it. Put a new stud in its place. Push so some threads of the stud come through on the front.

Twist a wheel bolt on and tighten down the bolt with an impact wrench if you have one. As you tighten down the wheel bolt, it pulls the stud through the hub. You'll need to add extra bolts as the stud comes out further.

Unscrew the bolts that you used to replace the stud on your Silverado. Reassemble the parts and put on the wheel. Tighten down the nut to finish the job.

Items you will need

  • Jack, lug wrench and jack tools

  • Blocks

  • Replacement stud

  • Vise-grips

  • Open end wrench

  • Crescent wrench

  • Dead blow hammer or heavy mallet

  • Extra wheel bolts and wheel nuts

  • Impact wrench (if available) or 1/2-inch long handled drive socket wrench

 How to Replace a Wheel Stud in a Geo Tracker

Buy a new stud. If you aren't sure of the size to buy to replace the stud in your Tracker, wait until you remove it. Take the stud to the store with you.

Check under the front seat for the jack and jack tools. The jack handle is under the driver's seat and the jack and wheel wrench is under the passenger's seat. Be sure to block the tire diagonal to the jack.

Jack up the tracker and remove the wheel. Remove the caliper and the rotor in the front. In the back, there are drum brakes. In order to get the drum off, you need to remove the four bolts on some models. Release the parking brake cable tension, and if you must, use a special tool from the company and a slide hammer to get the drum off. This is primarily on the 1989 to 1995 models.

Look for an area that allows the stud to freely move out the back. If you can feel the head of the stud by reaching behind, then you're okay. Otherwise look for an opening and line the stud up with that space. If there's no available spot remove the hub and put it in the vise.

Smack the stud with a mallet and drive it out the back. Put in a new stud. Push it through until at least enough threads show to put on a wheel bolt.

Put a wheel bolt onto the end of the stud that comes out of the opening toward you. Make sure the slanted edges face you. Tighten these down and, as you do, notice how they pull the stud through the hole. Keep tightening and adding more bolts until the stud seats flat against the hub in the back.

Remove the bolts and put the items back on in reverse order that you took off to replace the stud in your Tracker. Put the wheel on and tighten down the wheel nuts.

Items you will need

  • Jack, lug wrench and jack tools

  • Blocks

  • Replacement stud

  • Vise-grips

  • Open end wrench

  • Crescent wrench

  • Dead blow hammer or heavy mallet

  • Extra wheel bolts and wheel nuts

  • Impact wrench (if available) or 1/2-inch long handled drive socket wrench

About the Author

This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us.

More Articles