How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads in My Cars

by Contributing Writer; Updated June 12, 2017

Replacing the rear brake pads on a Ford car is a necessary part of the truck's regular maintenance schedule. Brake pads wear out as part of their normal operation. As such, rear pads are smaller than front pads. With that in mind, you can expect to replace the rear brake pads once Ford car every two to three times you replace the front pads. Anyone with basic automotive-repair experience can replace the rear pads on a Ford car in less than two hours.

Under The Hood:

 How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads in My Dodge Avenger

Shove the wheel chocks against the front and back of the right-front tire. Loosen the Avenger's rear lug nuts with your lug wrench by turning them counterclockwise.

Lift the back end of the Avenger with the floor jack. Support it on jack stands. Take the rear lug nuts and wheels off the Dodge by hand.

Set the drip pan below the Avenger's right-rear brake assembly and wash the brake dust off the rotor and caliper with brake cleaner.

Remove the caliper bolts with your socket set. Lift the caliper out of the mount and remove the old rear brake pads by hand. Discard the old pads.

Wash the caliper pistons and slides with brake cleaner. Lube the slides with a generous amount of white lithium grease.

Push the pistons back into the caliper with the caliper tool. Install the new rear brake pads by hand.

Set the caliper into the mount and bolt it in place with your socket set. Reinstall the back tires and lug nuts.

Lower the Avenger off the jack stands. Tighten the rear lug nuts to 85 ft.-lbs. with your torque wrench. Move the wheel chocks before operating the car.

Items you will need

  • 2 wheel chocks

  • Lug wrench

  • Floor jack

  • 2 jack stands

  • Drip pan

  • Brake cleaner

  • Socket set

  • Caliper tool

  • Torque wrench

 How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Dodge Durango

Remove the Rear Brake Pads

Park your car on a level surface. Set the parking brake. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

Raise the rear end of your car with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

Slide the caliper off of the disc brake and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

Remove the inboard and outboard brake pads from the caliper. Also remove the top and bottom anti-rattle springs. Keep track of the springs because they are not interchangeable.

Install Rear Brake Pads

Use a C-clamp to bottom, or align, the piston with the caliper bore. Put a piece of wood or an old brake pad between the clamp and the piston. Remove the clamp and wood or brake pad.

Clean the caliper and the anti-rattle pins. Use brake grease to lubricate the springs.

Install the top and bottom anti-rattle springs. Remember that the springs are not interchangeable.

Place the inboard and outboard pad in the caliper. Replace the caliper on the adapter on the rotor.

Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground. Pump the brakes a few times to seat the brakes. Do this before trying to move your car.

Check the brake fluid level in the master cylinder container. Add fluid to the container as needed.

Items you will need

  • Car jack

  • New brake pads

  • Brake grease

  • Brake fluid

 How to Change Rear Brake Pads on a Pontiac G6

Remove 1/2 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder using a brake suction tool and then discard it appropriately.

Make sure the parking brake is not set or you will not be able to remove the rear calipers. Place a wheel block in front of one of the front tires on a flat, hard surface.

Crack the rear lug nuts loose on the G6 with the tire iron. Only turn them about 1/4 turn to loosen them.

Lift one rear quarter of the G6 with the jack and support it onto a jack stand. Repeat this for the other side to suspend the rear axle. Finish removing the lug nuts and then remove the tires and set them out of the way.

Remove the two caliper-mounting bolts using a box-end wrench and then pry the caliper off of the anchor, pads and rotor using a screwdriver.

Support the caliper to the rear coil spring with a caliper hook. You can use a metal coat hanger to make a makeshift caliper hook.

Insert the caliper piston tool onto the caliper piston. The tool features six different-sized piston options, so be sure to match up the correct-sized side of the tool to the caliper piston. Place the 3/8-inch ratchet into the square drive of the tool and turn the piston inward clockwise until it begins to resist. The pistons on the G6 caliper will stick out slightly once fully seated in the bore.

Pull the caliper pins out of the caliper anchor, one at a time. Wipe off the old grease and re-lubricate it with new brake lubricant and then reinsert it into it respective anchor hole. One of the pins has a rubber bushing on the end, so make sure the pins get placed in the same location.

Remove the rear pads and hardware from the caliper anchor. Use the screwdriver to pry the hardware off of the anchor if necessary.

Place the new hardware from the replacement pad set onto the anchor and then lubricate the top sections of the hardware that the pad tabs contact. Be careful not to get lubricant on the rear rotors.

Place the new pads (and shims supplied in the replacement pad set) into the anchor.

Remove the caliper hook and replace the caliper over the pads. Align the caliper bolt-mounting holes to the caliper pins and then replace the bolts. Tighten the bolts to 45 to 55 foot lbs. with a torque wrench and socket. Repeat the brake pad replacement for the opposite side.

Replace tires and lug nuts and tighten the lug nuts snug. Lower the G6 to the ground and then re-tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot lbs. with the torque wrench and socket.

Ensure the master cylinder cap is on tightly. Pump the foot brake pedal several times slowly until the pedal feels firm. Apply and disengage the hand brake several times.

Add brake fluid to the master cylinder to the full mark if necessary. Replace the cap. Remove the wheel block and then test drive the G6 for proper braking operation.

Items you will need

  • Brake fluid suction tool

  • Wheel block

  • Tire iron

  • Jack

  • Jack stands (2)

  • Box-end wrench set

  • Screwdriver

  • Caliper hook

  • 3/8-inch drive caliper piston tool

  • 3/8-inch drive ratchet

  • Replacement pad set with hardware

  • Brake lubricant

  • Torque wrench with socket set

  • Brake fluid

 How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a Jeep Liberty

Removal

Open the cap on the brake fluid reservoir in the engine compartment. If the brake fluid level is at or near the maximum level, siphon out up to two-thirds of it using an unused turkey baster or similar suction device.

Raise the vehicle's rear end, support it on jack stands and remove the rear wheels. It will help to loosen the lug nuts with the tire iron before you raise the vehicle.

Wash off the brake caliper assembly with aerosol brake cleaner.

Compress the caliper piston using a C-clamp; the piston is located under the center arch of the caliper. Watch the brake fluid level in the master cylinder as you compress the piston, and make sure it doesn't overflow.

Remove the two mounting bolts from the caliper with a wrench; don't remove the banjo bolt for the brake hose. Swing the caliper up and remove it from the disc, and tie it to the coil spring with a wire.

Remove the brake pads from the caliper. Pry the outer pad out with a flat screwdriver; the inner pad is seated in the caliper piston with a prong-like retaining clip.

Remove the anti-rattle clips from the caliper's mounting bosses. Clean and reinstall them.

Installation

Install the new inner brake pad into the caliper piston using its clip. Line up the outer pad's protrusions with the slots on the caliper frame, and push the caliper in until it seats in the caliper.

Pull out the bushings from the caliper and clean them. Apply an anti-seize compound to the bushings and install them back in the caliper.

Reconnect the brake caliper to its mounting bracket--engage the upper end with the anti-rattle clip at the bracket's top end, and swing the caliper down onto the bracket. Install and tighten the mounting bolts.

Reconnect the rear wheels and lower the vehicle after changing both sets of brake pads.

Refill the brake master cylinder reservoir with brake fluid as needed.

Press the brake pedal multiple time until it feels firm to seat the brake pads.

Items you will need

  • Turkey baster

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands

  • Tire iron

  • Brake cleaner

  • C-clamp

  • Wrench

  • Wire

  • Flat screwdriver

  • Anti-seize compound

  • Small brush

  • DOT 3 brake fluid

 How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Chevy Camaro

Prepare the Camaro for Repair Work

Park your car on a level surface. If your car has a stick shift, put the car in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

Open the hood of your car and disconnect the negative battery cable.

Locate the master cylinder and the plastic brake fluid reservoir. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid into the plastic container.

Raise the rear end of your Camaro with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

Remove the Rear Brake Pads

Hand tighten a wheel lug nut to a wheel stud to keep the rotor from moving while you work on the caliper.

Place a large C-clamp over the body of the brake caliper. Place the clamp ends against the rear of the caliper body and the outboard pad. Slowly tighten the clamp until the piston is depressed far enough for the caliper to slide past the brake rotor. Remove the C-clamp.

Use the socket wrench to remove the caliper guide pin bolts and remove the caliper from the caliper bracket. the bolts are on the back of the caliper. Support the caliper with the wire hanger or a small bungee cord.

Take the brake pads out of the caliper. Remove and inspect the brake pad retainers.

Install Rear Brake Pads

Place a large C-clamp over the body of the brake caliper. Place the clamp ends against the rear of the caliper body and the outboard pad or a wood block placed against the caliper piston. Tighten the clamp until the piston is completely compressed into the caliper bore. Remove the clamp and the old pad or wood block.

Install the brake pad retainers and the brake pads in the caliper bracket. Position the brake pad wear sensor, mounted on the inboard brake pad, so that it is in the trailing position when the brake rotates forward.

Return the caliper to the caliper bracket. Replace the brake caliper guide pin bolts and use the socket wrench to tighten to 23 foot pounds (31 Nm).

Replace the wheel assembly (tire). Lower the car to the ground. Press the brake pedal two thirds of its travel distance and release. Wait 15 seconds and depress the pedal the same distance. This seats the brake pads. Do this before trying to move your car.

Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads. Reconnect the negative battery cable.

Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

Items you will need

  • Car jack

  • Lug nut wrench

  • Turkey baster

  • Plastic container

  • C-clamp

  • Allen head, star head, or 6-point socket wrench

  • Penetrating oil

  • Small bungee cord or wire hanger

  • New brake pads

  • Brake fluid

 How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a 2006 Ford F-150

Put the wheel chocks in front of the front wheels to prevent the F-150 from rolling. Loosen the rear lug nuts with the lug wrench.

Lift the rear end with the jack and place the two jack stands under the rear axle. Put the jack stands out by the leaf-spring perches for best stability.

Remove the lug nuts and rear wheels by hand.

Put the drop pan on the ground below the left rear brake assembly. Spray off the brakes with the brake cleaner to remove as much brake dust as possible.

Unbolt the brake caliper from the hub using the socket set. Lift the caliper off the brake rotor and then pull the old brake pads out of the caliper by hand.

Spray the inside of the brake caliper with the brake cleaner to clean out the brake dust. Lubricate the caliper slides with white lithium grease.

Insert the new brake pads in the same position and orientation as the old pads. Slide the brake caliper back over the rotor and bolt it back in place with the socket set.

Perform steps four through seven on the right rear brakes.

Put the wheels and lug nuts back on by hand. Tighten the lug nuts down as far as possible by hand. Lower the F-150 off the jack stands using the jack and then tighten the lug nuts to 140 ft-lbs. with the torque wrench.

Items you will need

  • Wheel chocks

  • Lug wrench

  • Jack

  • 2 jack stands

  • Drop pan

  • Brake cleaner

  • Socket set

  • White lithium grease

  • Torque wrench

 How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a GMC Sierra

Remove the Old Brake Pads

Park your car on a level surface. If you have a stick shift car, make sure the car is in gear. Place blocks in front of the front tires so the car does not move while you are working on it.

Open the hood of your car. Locate the master cylinder and brake fluid container. If necessary, remove brake fluid until the level in the container is less than half full. A turkey baster is a good tool for this. Put the brake fluid in the plastic container and dispose of it the way you dispose of motor oil.

Raise the rear end of your F-Series with your car jack. Remove the rear tire or wheel assembly.

Use the socket wrench to remove the caliper bolts from the back of the caliper. Slide the caliper off of the disc brake and suspend it near the disc brake with a small bungee cord or coat hanger. Suspend the caliper housing so that you do not damage the brake hose.

Remove the inner and outer brake pads from the caliper. Remove the caliper clips and throw them away.

Install the New Brake Pads

Insert the new brake pads into the caliper. Slide the new clips (that come with the brake pads) onto the caliper mounting bracket.

Attach the caliper mounting bracket to the backing plate assemble.

Place the caliper on the steering knuckle and tighten the bracket bolts to 148 foot pounds (200 Nm) for a 15 series vehicle; 122 foot pounds (165 Nm) for a 25 series vehicle. Use the socket wrench to attach the clipper bolts and tighten them to 80 foot pounds (108 Nm).

Replace the tire wheel assembly. Lower the car to the ground. Pump the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads.

Add fluid to the master cylinder container to replace any you removed before you removed the old brake pads.

Season the brake pads by making only gentle stops when you are driving for the first week after you install the new brake pads. Try not to do any hard stopping when you are seasoning the brakes.

Items you will need

  • Car jack

  • Lug nut wrench

  • Turkey baster

  • Heavy duty plastic container

  • Allen head, star head, or 6-point socket wrench

  • Penetrating oil

  • Small bungee cord or wire coat hanger

  • New brake pads

  • Red Loctite®272

  • Brake part cleaner

  • Brake fluid

 How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a 2002 Mazda Protege

Use a lug wrench to loosen the lug nuts on the rear wheels of the Mazda.

Lift the back end of the vehicle with the lifting jack and place jack stands beneath the frame of the Mazda.

Remove the lug nuts and rear wheels of the vehicle.

Use a 14 mm wrench to remove the caliper slide pins from the rear brake calipers.

Lift the caliper from the rotor. Pry the brake pads from either side of the caliper with a flathead screwdriver or other flat pry tool.

Place the 4.5 mm Allen wrench into the caliper piston inside the caliper. Turn the wrench clockwise to screw the piston into the side of the caliper. The piston needs to be fully opened to accommodate the new brake pads.

Spread a thin layer of brake grease on the back of the new brake pads and clip them to the caliper walls. The metal clips can be fastened to the sides of the caliper by hand.

Place the caliper over the rotor and screw in the caliper slide pins with the 14 mm wrench.

Place the wheel on the wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts. Lift the back end of the Mazda with the jack and remove the jack stands. Lower the rear tires back to the ground.

Press the brake pedal and hold it down for 10 seconds. Release the pedal and repeat the depression to return the rear caliper piston to the proper starting position.

Pull the hood release lever under the dashboard on the driver's side of the vehicle and lift the hood.

Remove the master cylinder cap located at the back, right-hand side of the engine compartment.

Check the level of brake fluid in the reservoir and add new DOT-3 brake fluid as needed. Replace the master cylinder cap and close the Mazda's hood.

Items you will need

  • Lug wrench

  • Lifting jack

  • Jack stands

  • 14 mm wrench

  • Flathead screwdriver

  • 4.5 mm Allen wrench

  • Brake pads

  • Brake grease

  • Brake fluid (if necessary)

 How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Miata

Remove one-third of the brake fluid from the master cylinder in the engine compartment after parking the Miata on a hard level surface suitable for lifting and supporting the vehicle. Discard the fluid.

Ensure the parking brake is not engaged and place a tire block in front of one of the front tires.

Loosen the rear wheel nuts with the jack wrench by turning them one-quarter turn counterclockwise.

Lift the rear of the Miata with the car jack, one side at a time, and then support the car on jack stands in a safe and secure location. Finish removing the wheel nuts and wheels.

Locate the manual caliper piston adjustment gear plug on the back side of the caliper housing and pull it out of the housing by hand.

Insert a metric Allen wrench key and turn the piston adjustment key counterclockwise until the caliper piston is fully retracted within its bore. Replace the plug after the piston has been retracted.

Remove the lower caliper bolt with a metric hand wrench and lift the caliper upward off of the brake pads.

Remove the old brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket and then remove the brake pads' upper and lower hardware clips from the bracket.

Install the new hardware clips onto the bracket and then apply a light coat of silicone brake lubricant to the brake pad contact points on the clips.

Insert the new pads onto the hardware clips in the mounting brackets.

Pivot the caliper down over the pads and rotor, align the lower caliper mounting bolt and then tighten the bolt to 30-foot pounds with a torque wrench and metric socket. Replace the pads on the opposite side.

Replace the wheels and wheel nuts and then tighten them flush to the wheel and hub. Raise the Miata up just enough to remove each jack stand and then lower the Miata slowly to the ground. Torque the wheel nuts to 80-foot pounds with a torque wrench and socket in a crisscross pattern.

Ensure the master cylinder cap is secure and then pump the brake pedal several times until it feels normal. This will seat the new pads to the rotors and extend the caliper pistons outward.

Recheck the brake fluid in the master cylinder and top off as necessary with new brake fluid only.

Items you will need

  • Brake fluid siphon

  • Tire block

  • Jack wrench

  • Car jack

  • Jack stand(s)

  • Metric hand wrench set

  • Metric Allen wrench set

  • Replacement pad set with hardware clips

  • Silicone brake lubricant

  • Torque wrench and metric socket set

  • Brake fluid

 How to Replace the Rear Brake Pads on a 1995 Buick Regal

Remove the initial torque from the rear wheel lug nuts, using a tire iron. Do not remove the lug nuts completely, but turn them so they are unstuck (3/4 turn). Lift the rear of the Buick using a 2-ton jack or a jack with greater capacity. Set jack stands beneath the rear suspension arms or the rear axle beam, just inside the rear wheel assembly. Remove the lug nuts completely with a tire iron, then remove both rear wheels from the Regal.

Remove the rear caliper mounting bolts on one side of the Regal. Use a 3/8-inch ratchet to turn the caliper bolts counterclockwise until they are removed. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a pry bar to gently pry the caliper off. Set the caliper on the suspension arm behind the brake assembly. Do not let the caliper hang freely or you can damage the fragile rubber brake hose.

Remove the old brake pads from the caliper mounting bracket, using a pry bar to gently pry the pads off if necessary. Lubricate the portion of the caliper mounting bracket that touches the brake pads. This is the part of the mounting bracket that the tips of the brake pads slide into. Proper lubrication is essential in reinstalling the brakes, to ensure optimal performance and function of the new pads. Use caliper grease that is rated for disc brakes.

Install the new brake pads onto the caliper mounting bracket. Two of the brake pads have wear indicators. These pads go on the inside of the caliper bracket, behind the rotor. Do not place both pads with wear indicators on one side of the Regal. The wear indicators are small metal tongues on the end of the pads that have a 90-degree bend in them, and are the reason for the "squealing" noise when pads get low. Install the wear indicator-equipped pad behind the rotor, and the non-wear indicator pad on the front or outside of the caliper bracket.

Lubricate the backing plates or shim plates on the back side of both of the newly installed brake pads. Failure to lubricate the back of the pads can cause squeaking in the new brakes within a couple hours of installation and driving. Dab caliper grease on the back side of the pads to create a thin film on the pads.

Install a 6-inch extension onto a 3/8-inch drive ratchet. On the opposite end of the extension install a caliper brake tool. The caliper brake tool is a 6-sided cube that has different adapter teeth on each side for use on multiple different vehicles. The rear calipers of the Regal have oscillating or rotating pistons. As the piston expands when you hit the brake pedal, it also rotates in a screw-like motion. The brake tool is essential in working on the rear brakes of many vehicles, as there are many vehicles with rotating rear caliper pistons.

Insert the caliper tool onto the piston of the rear brake caliper. Hold the caliper in one hand, while holding the ratchet, extension, and tool in your other hand. Turn the ratchet clockwise while simultaneously applying pressure to the piston on the rear caliper. This turning and pushing movement will compress the rear caliper piston. Compress the piston until it is nearly flush with the inside back wall of the caliper. The piston does not compress completely flush.

Install the compressed rear rotor back onto the Regal with one hand. Start the caliper mounting bolts through the caliper and into the mounting bracket, by hand. Turn the bolts clockwise to start them until the caliper can stand freely without you holding it. Tighten the caliper bolts to between 60 and 80 foot-pounds of torque. You can approximate this without using a torque wrench by snugging the bolts with a 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket, then turn the ratchet 1/2-turn farther once the bolts are snug -- but using a torque wrench is best.

Repeat Steps 2 through 8 to complete the second side of the rear pads on the Regal. Performing this project on one side of the vehicle at a time will provide a visual reference for how the brakes look when they are assembled. This is useful if you have any questions about how the brakes go back together.

Install the rear wheels on the Regal after you have installed and torqued both rear brake calipers on the vehicle. Snug the lug nuts onto the wheel studs, using a tire iron. Lift the rear of the Regal off of the jack stands, and remove the jack stands from beneath the Regal. Lower the vehicle and tighten the lug nuts between 90 and 110 foot-pounds of torque. Use a certified torque wrench and lug nut socket to properly torque the wheel nuts.

Items you will need

  • 3/8-inch drive ratchet and socket set, with 6-inch extension

  • 3/8-drive brake caliper tool

  • Small pry bar

  • Tub of caliper grease (make sure it says safe for use on disc brakes)

  • New brake pads

  • 2-ton or greater capacity jack

  • 2 jack stands

  • Tire iron

  • 2 wheel chocks

  • Certified torque wrench

 How to Change the Rear Brake Pads on a Kia Spectra

Removing the Brake Pads

Park your Kia Spectra on a level surface, set the transmission to Neutral and release the parking brake.

Open the hood and siphon at least half the fluid from the reservoir on the brake master cylinder into a plastic bottle using a clean turkey baster. Store the old fluid in a safe place for recycling later.

Loosen the lug nuts on both rear wheel assemblies with a lug wrench.

Raise both rear wheel/tire assemblies using a floor jack and install a jack stand on each side under the frame, near the wheels, for support. Lower the vehicle over the jack stands and remove the floor jack.

Remove both rear wheels and replace the brake pads on one brake assembly at a time.

Detach the clip holding the caliper brake hose to the suspension arm using a pair of nose pliers, if your Kia model is equipped with it.

Unscrew and remove the upper and lower caliper guide bolts using a ratchet and a hex socket.

Lift the brake caliper from the caliper bracket and secure it to one of the suspension components with mechanic’s wire to prevent damage to the brake hose connected to the caliper.

Make a note of the mounting position of the plate wear indicator behind the inner brake pad on the caliper bracket and the shim behind the outer brake pad on the caliper bracket and remove the brake pads, plate indicator and shim.

Installing the New Brake Pads

Wipe brake dust from the brake assembly using brake parts cleaner and lint-free towels.

Rotate the brake caliper piston slowly using a brake-caliper rewind tool to seat the piston into its bore, making sure to align the piston cutout with the tab on the back of the new inner-brake pad.

Install the plate wear indicator, new inner brake pad, new outer brake pad and shim on the caliper bracket.

Position the brake caliper on the bracket and hand-tighten the upper and lower caliper guide bolts. Tighten the guide bolts with the ratchet and hex socket.

Attach the brake hose to the suspension arm using the nose pliers, if your Kia model is equipped with it.

Replace the brake pads on the opposite brake assembly as described above, beginning with Step 6 of the previous section.

Install both rear wheels and lug nuts.

Lower the vehicle using the floor jack and finish tightening the lug nuts.

Add new brake fluid to the reservoir on the brake master cylinder to bring the level to the "Full" mark.

Depress fully the brake pedal five times to seat the new brake pads on the brake rotor.

Road-test your Kia on a lightly used road to make sure the brakes are working properly.

Drive to a highway with few cars, slow the vehicle from 60 mph to 10 mph and repeat eight times without stopping. Then cruise at about 40 to 50 mph to allow the brakes to cool down. This will help bed your new brake pads, prevent brake squeal and extend the service life of your new pads.

Items you will need

  • Plastic bottle

  • Turkey baster

  • Lug wrench

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands (2)

  • Nose pliers (optional)

  • Ratchet

  • Hex bit

  • Mechanic's wire

  • Brake parts cleaner

  • Lint-free towels

  • Brake-caliper rewind tool

  • New brake fluid

 How to Replace Rear Brake Pads on an Audi A6

Break loose the rear lug nuts on the A6. Turn them 1/4 turn counterclockwise with a tire wrench.

Raise the rear of the A6 onto jack stands. Use the rear jack point behind the trunk to lift up on the car. Then, place jack stands on the rear jack supports in the rear of the vehicle. They are located on the side of the vehicle just behind the front doors on the bottom of the car. Then, lower the A6 onto the jack stands.

Remove the lug nuts, and pull the wheel off the rear hub.

Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts with a socket wrench and 13mm socket. The rear calipers are unlike most calipers, because they have a nut that turns with the caliper bolts. To remove the mounting bolts, you'll need to hold this retaining nut still with a crescent wrench or open-end wrench while removing the mounting bolts.

Pull the caliper off the rotor. The pads should fall right off, because the A6 doesn't use a retainer on the rear caliper.

Retract the caliper piston with the caliper piston tool. Slide the tool over the grooves in the piston and turn the piston clockwise to retract the piston back into the caliper.

Slide the new pads into the caliper so that the curved end of the pad is facing inward toward the caliper.

Slide the caliper back over the rotor and put the brakes back together. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly.

Items you will need

  • Tire wrench

  • Jack

  • Two jack stands

  • Socket wrench

  • Socket set

  • 13mm open-end wrench or crescent wrench

  • Brake caliper retraction tool (available from Audi)