How to Replace a Caliper in Cars

by Contributing Writer; Updated June 12, 2017

A truck like the Dodge car is often driven hard, and that takes a toll on the brakes. Eventually, parts like the calipers will need to be replaced. If you're a truck driver looking to replace your Dodge car calipers yourself, study up on the procedure and consult with your mechanic before doing so.

Under The Hood:

 How to Replace a Caliper in a Dodge Caravan

Remove the Old Caliper

Raise and support the van, making sure you use a jack for a vehicle of its size. Remove the wheel.

Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper by removing the attaching bolt. Discard the seal washers. Plug the hose to prevent fluid from leaking.

Remove the caliper guide pin bolts. Slide the caliper slowly away from the steering knuckle. Slide the caliper's opposite end out from under the machined abutment on the steering knuckle.

Clean the steering knuckle abutment surfaces of any grease, dirt or corrosion. Spray a fine mist of water on the surface and use a damp rag for this. Lubricate the abutment surfaces with a liberal amount of multipurpose lubricant.

Install the New Caliper

Position the new caliper over the brake pads and disc rotor. Be careful not to damage the caliper seals or guide pin bushings from the steering knuckle bosses while installing.

Reinstall the caliper guide pin bolts. Make sure you don't cross thread them. Torque the front caliper bolts to 195 inch pounds. Torque the rear caliper bolts to 192 inch pounds.

Attach the brake hose to the caliper with new washers. Tighten the bolt to 35 foot pounds.

Bleed the brake system. Open the bleeder valve on the assembly, attach a transparent hose to it and press on the brake pedal to remove air from the system.

Place the wheel back on the vehicle and torque the lug nuts to 100 foot pounds. Lower the van and pump the brake pedal several times to insure firmness. Then test drive the van.

Items you will need

  • Allen wrench

  • Tire iron

  • Jack

  • Oil/fluid pan

  • Caliper for Caravan

  • Copper washers

  • Transparent hose

 How to Replace a Caliper in a Dodge Ram

Remove the Old Caliper

Raise and support the truck on one end of a jack stand, Remove the wheel for the caliper you are replacing.

Remove the caliper mounting bolts, using a 3/8 inch hex or socket wrench. Loosen the bolt securing the brake hose fitting bolt in the caliper.

Extract the caliper from the rotor toward the rear and out of its mount. Remove the hose fitting bolt completely, then remove the caliper with the pads still installed.

Plug the brake hose with a piece of plastic to prevent losing or contaminating the brake fluid.

Remove the brake pads from the old caliper if they are still good.

Install the New Caliper

Lubricate the mounting bolts, bushings, collars and bores. Silicone grease works best.

Attach the brake pads to the new caliper. Using new pads is best.

Install the caliper over the rotor. Seat it in the old caliper's original position until flush. Install the mounting bolts and tighten them to the appropriate torque for your model. (Consult your mechanic for the right torque.)

Connect the brake hose to the caliper, using new washers.

Reattach the wheel and lower the truck.

Pump the brakes multiple times to seat the pads. Then, road test them.

Items you will need

  • 3/8 inch socket wrench

  • Tire iron

  • Jack

  • Caliper for Ram

  • Copper washers

  • Small rubber piece

 How to Replace a Caliper in a Honda Accord

Remove the Old Caliper

Drain and discard brake fluid from the master cylinder. You should drain about two-thirds the amount, or to the midway point between the minimum and maximum level.

Raise and support the car on a jack stand. Remove the wheel to get to get to the caliper you need.

Disconnect the brake hose at the bracket mounting bolt. Plug the line with a piece of plastic to avoid contaminating the fluid.

Remove the caliper flange bolts and remove the caliper from the rotor or bracket. Remove the brake pads, shims, and pad retainers.

Install the New Caliper

Connect the brake pads, shims and retainers to the new caliper. (You should probably use new ones.) Before connecting, apply a thin coat of assembly paste to the pad sides of pad shims and the back of the pads.

Rotate the caliper piston into the cylinder clockwise. Turn the piston back to align the piston cutout with the tab on the inner pad by so the caliper can be installed. Lubricate the boot with rubber grease so the piston boot won't twist.

Reconnect the caliper mounting bolts. Connect the brake line hose, using new washers with the banjo bolt.

Refill the master cylinder with fresh fluid if needed. Attach the wheel and lower the vehicle.

Check the parking brake adjustment. Pump the brake pedal multiple times to set the pads until the pedal feels firm. Test the brakes on the road.

Items you will need

  • Allen/socket wrench

  • Tire iron

  • Jack

  • Oil/fluid pan

  • Caliper for Accord

  • Copper washers

  • Small rubber piece

 How to Replace a Caliper in a Dodge Durango

Removal

Raise and support the truck. Place a prop rod on the brake pedal to keep pressure on the system. Remove the tire and wheel from the vehicle.

Disconnect the banjo bolt that supports the brake hose to the caliper. Toss away the copper washers. Plug the brake line with a piece of rubber.

Remove the slide pin bolts. You can then remove the disc brake caliper from the adapter.

Installation

Install the new disc brake caliper on the caliper adapter.

Connect the banjo bolt onto the caliper, using new copper washers. Make sure the brake hose isn't twisted or kinked. Tighten the bolt to 21 foot pounds.

Attach the caliper slide pin bolts. Tighten them to 24 foot pounds.

Remove the prop rod from the pedal. Bleed the brake system of any loose air by opening the bleeder valve and manually holding down on the pedal.

Install the tire and wheel assembly then lower the vehicle.

Items you will need

  • Allen wrench

  • Tire iron

  • Jack

  • Caliper for Durango

  • Copper washers

  • Small rubber piece

 How to Replace a Caliper in a Ford Explorer

Raise and support the vehicle on the jack stand on the end you need. Loosen the lug nuts and remove the wheel.

Remove the caliper slide pin bolts. Lift the caliper off of the anchor plate. Suspend the caliper with wire or position it on a frame member. Don't let it hang by the brake hose.

Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper and plug the hose. Remove the caliper from the rotor.

Place the caliper over the brake pads and align the slide pin mounting holes. Install the slide pin bolts, tightening them to 24 foot pounds.

Connect the brake hose to the caliper. Use new washers on the bolt and tighten it to 26 foot pounds.

Reinstall the wheel and tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot pounds. Lower the vehicle.

 How to Replace a Caliper in a Saturn VUE

Remove the front wheel and tire once the vehicle is securely raised. Make sure you're using a jack stand suitable for a larger vehicle like the VUE.

Disconnect the brake hose from the caliper and throw away the copper washers that were connected with the bolt. Plug the holes in the hose and caliper with rubber pieces.

Extract the guide pin and lock pin to free the caliper. Make sure you don't damage the pin boots while you remove the caliper.

Lubricate the guide pins and pin boots with silicone grease before installing the new caliper. Place the caliper in position on the support and over the brake pads, and install the lubricated bolts.

Connect the brake hose to the caliper, using two new washers with the bolt. See that the brake line isn't twisted and is correctly routed with a loop to the rear.

Bleed the brake system. Open the bleeder valve and connect a transparent hose or tube to it. Have another person press the pedal to release air from the system.

Reconnect the wheel and lower the vehicle. Make sure the brakes are set by pumping the brake pedal until it feels firm.

Items you will need

  • Saturn VUE caliper

  • Jack stand

  • Tire iron

  • Various wrenches

  • Replacement copper washers

  • Small rubber pieces

  • Transparent tube

  • C-clamp

About the Author

This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us.