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How to Install a New Steering Rack in a Hyundai Sonata

by Contributor; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Jack and jack stands

  • Special tool (09568-34000)

  • Torque wrench

How to Install a New Steering Rack in a Hyundai Sonata. The Hyundai Sonata was officially considered a mid-sized car through the end of its third generation in 2005. The third generation also replaced the manual steering rack with a power rack and pinion assembly. You can install a new rack on models from 1998 to 2005 by following a set of somewhat challenging procedures.

Unhook the battery cables. Raise and support your front end. Locate the universal joint, then disconnect the cover-fixing clip on the indoor driver's side and loosen the noise covers. Disconnect the joint from the gearbox.

Pull the right hand and left hand front wheels. Use special tool (09568-34000) to pull the slip pin from the outer tie and separate the tie rod from the steering knuckle. You also need to disconnect the flexible coupler on the steering column.

Drain the steering fluid, then remove the engine undercover and front muffler. Disconnect the pressure and return hoses and remove the connecting brackets. Continue to disconnect or remove the subframe center beam, exhaust front pipe, left lower control arm and the stabilizer bar.

Remove the gearbox mounting clamp and the clamp holding the hoses. Unfasten the gearbox mounting bolt and gently pull the assembly to the right until free of the vehicle. Make sure not to damage the bellows.

Replace the old gear with the new assembly and tighten the bolts to 44 to 59 ft-lb torque. Reconnect the stabilizer bar, control arm, exhaust pipe and center beam, hoses and brackets. Tighten the bolt to the steering column's flexible coupler between 11 and 14 foot pounds of torque and the tie rod end nuts to 17 to 25 foot pounds of torque.

Mount the wheels and reconnect the battery cables. Refill the steering fluid and check for leaks with the engine running.

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