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How to Change the Rear Disc Brakes on a 2000 GMC Jimmy 4WD

by Jule Pamplin; Updated November 07, 2017

Items you will need

  • Baster or brake fluid siphon tool

  • Lug wrench

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands

  • 16 mm wrench

  • C-clamps

  • Brake pads

  • Brake grease

  • Brake parts cleaner

  • Cloth towel

  • Funnel

  • Brake fluid

The rear disc brakes on the 2000 GMC Jimmy are not only responsible for stopping the vehicle within the intended stopping distance, but for maintaining driver control throughout the braking. The rear brakes endure less stress than the front brakes yet are as important to the overall braking system. General Motors recommends replacing the brake pads every 40,000 miles. Brake pad maintenance also offers an opportunity to inspect and address any concerns regarding the other components of the braking system. Replace the brakes at the earliest sign of significant wear or damage.

Park the Jimmy on a level surface and turn the engine off. Pull the hood release located on the driver's side, under the dashboard. Go to the front of the vehicle.

Lift the hood and locate the master cylinder. The master cylinder cap is situated on the right side of the engine, in the back of the engine compartment. Remove the cap and siphon half of the brake fluid from the reservoir with a turkey baster or brake fluid siphon. Dispose of the removed brake fluid—do not reuse it.

Turn each lug nut on the rear wheels one full turn with the lug wrench or 21 mm socket and breaker bar.

Lift the Jimmy with the floor jack and set jack stands under the rear axles. Lower the back of the vehicle onto the stands and move the jack out of the way.

Remove the lug nuts and take the Jimmy's rear tires off.

Locate and remove the two caliper bolts. The caliper is the metal piece that surrounds three sides of the brake rotor. It contains the brake pads and pistons. The caliper bolts are located on the back side of the caliper, near the outer edge. Turn each bolt two full turns with a 16 mm socket wrench and finish removing them both by hand.

Lift the caliper from the caliper bracket and rotor. Suspend each caliper over the brake assembly with a wire hanger or bungee cord so that the caliper is not hanging by the brake line.

Slide each of the brake pads from the caliper bracket. Each of the two brake pads sit inside the slots of the bracket on either side of the rotor. Pull them straight from the rotor.

Apply brake grease to the back side of the new brake pads, the side opposite the brake pad material that will face each side of the rotor when installed.

Slide the new pads into the slots of the Jimmy's caliper bracket.

Place each of the two C-clamps over the caliper pistons that extend from the inside of the caliper and the back side of the caliper. Screw the clamp to force both pistons into the side of the caliper. Back the clamps of the caliper by turning the handles counterclockwise and remove them once the pistons are fully depressed.

Replace the caliper over the new brake pads.

Inspect the caliper bolts. Clean them with brake parts cleaner and a cloth towel if necessary. Apply a thin layer of brake grease to each bolt before replacing them. Screw in the caliper bolts by hand, then tighten them with the 16 mm wrench.

Repeat the process for the brake pads on the other side of the Jimmy.

Replace the wheels/tires onto the rear wheel bolts and screw on the lug nuts.

Replace the jack under the Jimmy and lift the back of the vehicle. Remove the jack stands and lower the rear tires to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench.

Return to the driver's seat and start the engine. Press the brake pedal slowly until the pedal response feels normal. The first few times will feel soft and then begin to stiffen once the caliper pistons are reset. Return to the Jimmy's engine compartment.

Place a funnel inside the brake fluid reservoir (maser cylinder) and fill it with brake fluid. Remove the funnel and replace the master cylinder cap. Close the Jimmy's hood.

About the Author

Jule Pamplin has been a copywriter for more than seven years. As a financial sales consultant, Pamplin produced sales copy for two of the largest banks in the United States. He attended Carnegie-Mellon University, winning a meritorious scholarship for the Careers in Applied Science and Technology program, and later served in the 1st Tank Battalion of the U.S. Marine Corps.

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