How to Change the Oil Pump on Ford Cars

by Contributing Writer; Updated June 12, 2017

Oil is the life blood of your vehicle's engine. Oil lubricates many of the moving parts to reduce friction and engine temperature. Keeping the oil flowing will add years of life to the engine, and the oil pump is an integral component. Replacing a worn-out pump yourself will save you hundreds of dollars in repair bills. There is a fair amount of tear down that needs to be performed before you get to the pump itself, which makes this a moderately challenging task.

Under The Hood:

 How to Change the Oil Pump on 2000 Ford Expedition

Drive the Expedition onto a set of ramps and secure it using the parking brake.

Place a drain pan under the oil pan and remove the drain plug using a socket. Drain the oil from the pan, then replace the drain plug.

Remove the bolts that secure the oil pan to the bottom of the engine using a socket and ratchet. Place a metal scraper between the pan and the engine to break the seal. Pull the pan free from the engine.

Disconnect the wiring harness from the oil pump.

Loosen the jam nut that secures the oil pump to the oil pickup tube using an adjustable wrench. Thread the oil pump off the pickup tube.

Thread the new oil pump onto the pickup tube and secure it by tightening the jam nut with the wrench.

Reconnect the wiring harness to the oil pump.

Scrape the old gasket material off the bottom of the engine and off the mating surface of the oil pan using a metal scraper.

Place the new gasket onto the oil pan and place the oil pan against the engine.

Thread the bolts into the oil pan and tighten them in an alternating fashion from side to side using the socket and ratchet.

Remove the oil filler cap from the driver's side valve cover, place a funnel into the valve cover and drain 4 qt. of motor oil into the valve cover. Close the cap.

Items you will need

  • Ramps

  • Drain pan

  • Socket set

  • Adjustable wrench

  • Scraper

  • Oil pan gasket

  • Funnel

  • 4 qt. engine oil

 How to Change the Oil Pump on a Ford 302

Remove the Old Oil Pump

Park your Ford on a level surface. Slide an oil drain pan under the engine. Make sure it is under the oil drain plug on the side of the oil pan bolted to the bottom of the engine.

Remove the oil drain plug with a socket set and let all of the engine oil drain out. Reinstall the oil drain plug when no more oil comes out.

Jack the front of the vehicle up and support the weight of the vehicle on jack stands. You may skip this step if your Ford chassis is high enough to allow you to easily access the bolts holding the drain pan in place (like on most trucks). You want enough room to be able to comfortably be able to work with a socket wrench.

Loosen and remove the bolts holding the oil pan to the underneath of the engine block. Pull the oil pan from the engine. Remove the oil pan gasket and discard it.

Follow the pick-up arm (a metal arm with a flat disk on the end protruding from the engine block into where the oil pan was) to where it connects to the oil pump. Find the two mounting bolts holding the oil pump to the engine block.

Remove the oil pump mounting bolts and withdraw the pump from the engine. This also removes the pick-up arm, as it is attached to the pump. Do not worry about this; there will be a new arm attached to your new oil pump.

Install New Oil Pump

Lay the new oil pump gasket on the mating surface of the oil pump. The mating surface is the flat metal part of the pump (by the bolt holes) that will press against (mate with) the engine block when installed.

Lift the pump into place and insert it into the engine block. Make sure the pick-up arm at the bottom of the pump is extending out of the engine and into where the oil pan will be. If you can't remember how the oil pan goes, before putting the pump in place hold the pan up so it is lined up with its bolt holes so you can see the direction of the pan. Don't worry about inserting the wrong end of the pump into the engine, it will fit only one way.

Place the mounting bolts through the bolt holes of the pump and tighten them with a socket wrench. You want to tighten the bolts until they are hand-tight, then turn them 1/4 of a turn with the socket wrench. You can tell when a bolt is hand-tight when using a socket wrench to install it because there will be no resistance from the wrench when using it until the moment it is hand-tight.

Lay the new oil pan gasket onto the oil pan edge, making sure the bolt holes in the gasket line up with the bolt holes in the pan.

Lift the pan into place and put in the bolts. Tighten them until hand-tight. Do not tighten past hand-tight. Go on to the next step, where you will use a pattern to tighten the bolts, ensuring the pan mounts and seals properly.

Finish tightening the bolts holding the oil drain pan to the engine block, working in a pattern so that you tighten all of the bolts a little bit at a time, working from side to side until they are all one full turn with the socket wrench past being hand-tight. Working in a pattern will ensure the pan is attached in a level fashion so it maintains a good seal.

Add engine oil. Check the specifications for your Ford truck or car to know how much to put in. Note that, if you raised your vehicle onto jack stands while you changed the oil pump, you need to lower it to the ground before adding oil.

Items you will need

  • Oil drain pan

  • Socket set

  • Car jack

  • Jack stands

  • Oil pump gasket

  • Oil pump

  • Oil pan gasket

  • Engine oil

 How to Change an Oil Pump on a Ford F150

Remove the oil pan drain plug and drain the oil into a drip pan. Dispose of the old oil properly, according to your local laws.

Remove the oil pan. Clean the mating surface and scrape away any bits of gasket from both the pan and the engine block.

Remove the oil pump support brace bolts and the bolts holding the pump to the block.

Remove the old pump and pickup tube assembly.

Prime the new pump with oil before installing. Fill the pump through the inlet and turn the shaft until oil spurts out of the outlet.

Re-attach the pump to the block with the two bolts removed earlier. Use the torque wrench and tighten to 22 to 32 foot-pounds.

Make sure the pickup tube bolts are tightened to 24 to 30 foot-pounds of torque.

Install a new oil pan gasket and re-install the oil pan. Use the torque wrench to tighten the 1/4-inch bolts to 84 to 108 inch-pounds. Tighten the 5/16-inch bolts to 108 to 132 inch-pounds.

Fill the oil pan with 6 quarts of new oil. Check for leaks around the oil pan.

Items you will need

  • Socket wrench

  • Torque wrench

  • Rags

 How to Replace an Oil Pump in a Ford Taurus

Remove Old Oil Pump

Drive your Ford Taurus up onto ramps or lifts so you have room to work as you pull out the oil pump. You could also use a jack, but make sure you brace the front wheels so they don't roll. In addition, set the emergency break firmly into position so the car doesn't roll.

Take the engine out and put it on an engine stand then remove the upper intake manifold. Take off the valve covers then the accessory drive belt.

Remove the power steering pump and the alternator. The water pump is the next component to remove, followed by the A/C compressor and bracket.

Rotate the pulley shaft clockwise to remove the crankshaft pulley. It has left-handed threads.

Pull out the oil pan and the oil pump screen and tube. Take off the front cover and the timing chains and remove the crankshaft timing gears. Finally, remove the oil pump, taking note of the bolts you removed and in which order you remove them.

Insert New Oil Pump

Install the new oil pump and put the bolts back on in the same manner you removed them. Tighten these bolts to 71 to 106 in-lb.

Reinsert the crankshaft timing gears, timing chains and front cover. Put the oil pump screen and tube back on, torquing the bolts to 71 to 106 in-lb, and torque the nut to 15 to 22 ft-lb.

Put the oil pan back in, then the crankshaft pulley. Install the A/C compressor and bracket using new bolts for the A/C. Add the water pump, alternator, power steering pump, the accessory drive belt, valve covers and upper intake manifold.

Replace the engine back into your Ford Taurus and fill the crankcase. Start your engine and look for leaks in the area you were working.

Items you will need

  • Wrench

  • New oil pump

  • New A/C bolts

 How to Replace the Oil Pump in a 351 Windsor

Drain the oil inside the oil pan by removing the bolt at the bottom of the pan with a wrench.

Remove the 22 bolts which secure the oil pan to the bottom of the cylinder block with a wrench, then lower the pan off the cylinder block to access the oil pump.

Remove the two bolts which secure the oil pump’s inlet tube and screen to the bottom of the oil pump with a wrench. Discard the old inlet tube gasket.

Remove the two bolts which secure the top of the oil pump to the cylinder block with a wrench, then lower the pump from the cylinder block. Discard the old oil pump gasket.

Pull the metal rod out of the top of the old oil pump, then insert the rod into the new pump.

Position a new oil pump gasket onto the mating surface on the top of the new pump.

Lift the new pump into position within the cylinder block while guiding the metal rod at the top of the pump into the engine. The metal rod meshes with the bottom of the distributor. It may be necessary to twist the rod until it connects with the distributor.

Install and tighten the pump’s two retaining bolts with a wrench.

Position a new inlet tube gasket onto the inlet tube, then position the tube against the bottom of the pump and install and tighten the tube’s two retaining bolts with a wrench.

Peel the old oil pan gasket off the pan, then coat a new pan gasket with gasket sealant.

Position the oil pan gasket onto the oil pan, then press the pan against the bottom of the cylinder block.

Install and tighten the oil pan’s 22 retaining bolts with a wrench.

Allow at least one hour to pass to allow the oil pan gasket sealer to dry, then fill the engine with oil through the valve cover.

Items you will need

  • Wrench

  • Oil pump gasket

  • Oil pump inlet tube gasket

  • Oil pan gasket

  • Gasket sealer

  • Engine oil

 How to Replace an Oil Pump on a 1993-1994 Ford Ranger

Disconnect the negative wire on the car battery to disable the airbag system; allow at least two minutes before continuing.

Cover the fenders and cowl with old blankets. Have an assistant hold one side of the hood as you remove the hood-to-hinge assembly with a metric wrench. Lift the hood off

Use metric wrenches to remove the air cleaner assembly.

Disconnect the cooling assembly and drain it.

Label the vacuum lines with different colored tape and sketch a diagram of where they will go for reinstallation. Disconnect the vacuum lines.

Label all coolant hoses, as you did the vacuum lines, and disconnect them from the engine.

Remove the drive belt by rotating the tension counterclockwise. Slip the belt off the pulleys.

Use metric wrenches to remove the radiator, cooling fan and shroud.

Locate the inertia switch and turn it off to relieve pressure in the fuel line. Disconnect the fuel line from the engine to the chassis. Plug all fittings.

Remove the oil pump by taking off its mounting screws.

Disconnect the throttle linkage with a wrench.

Unbolt the power steering pump with a metric wrench. Do not disconnect the cables and leave the pump sitting upright.

Use a metric wrench to unbolt the compressor if your Ranger is equipped with air conditioning. Do not disconnect any hoses or cables.

Remove the starter motor and alternator with a metric wrench.

Disconnect the exhaust system from the engine block.

Place a block of wood under the transmission. Attach an engine sling or chain to the lifting brackets on the engine block. Roll the engine hoist into position and attach it to the slings or chains.

Use a metric wrench to remove the engine-to-transmission bolts and the two transmission-to-oil pan bolts. Remove the engine mount-to-frame bolts.

Double-check for any bolts still holding the engine in place. Lift the engine out of the car.

Position the oil pan under the oil filter and drain plug. Use a metric wrench to remove the drain plug then allow all of the oil to drain into the pan. Use an oil filter wrench to loosen the filter. Unscrew the oil filter the rest of the way by hand so it does not slip and splash oil. Use a metric wrench to unscrew the oil pan bolts then remove the oil pan.

Pour a few ounces of clean oil into the inlet screen of the new oil pump. Turn the pump’s driveshaft until oil comes out of the inlet screen.

Insert the pump intermediate shaft into the engine block, making sure it engages the auxiliary shaft gear then reinstall the rest of the new oil pump.

Reinstall the oil pan and oil filter by reversing the removal steps. Reinstall the engine block by reversing the removal steps.

Replace the engine oil with new oil until it reaches the full mark on the dipstick.

Start the engine. If the oil pressure does not rise within 15 seconds, turn the engine off and check for leaks.

Items you will need

  • Set of metric wrenches

  • Drip pan

  • Oil filter wrench

  • Oil pan

  • Hoist or engine sling

 How to Replace an Oil Pump in a Ford Explorer

Remove Oil Pump

Drive your Ford Explorer up onto ramps or lifts so you have room to work as you pull out the oil pump. You could also use a jack, but make sure you brace the front wheels so they don't roll. In addition, set the emergency break firmly into position so the car doesn't roll.

Disconnect the negative battery cable and remove the starter motor. Take out the air cleaner outlet tube and drain the engine.

Remove the oil pump pickup tube and lower the block cradle bolts. Next, remove the bell housing-to-lower block cradle bolts, the bell housing-to-lower block cradle spacer and the lower block cradle nuts.

Take out the upper air deflector and remove the weather strip. Some vehicles have screws in the radiator fan shroud, but not all do.

Remove the screws if they are there and throw them out. Take out the bolts and fan shroud and remove the next bolt. Install the right lifting eye with the bolt you already removed. Secure the lifting tools in 4x2 Ford Explorer vehicles, take out the motor mount nuts and raise your engine.

Install the special tools so you can raise the right side of the motor in 4x4 Ford Explorer vehicles. Take out bolts (there are four of them) and the crossmember, then remove the right motor mount nut. Look for the left side through-bolt and -nut and raise the engine.

Back off the set screw until they are under the lower block cradle boss on both 4x2 and 4x4 vehicles. In the 4x4, take the bolt from the right side of the axle housing, then the left side lower axle housing nut and bolt. Remove the upper side housing axle bolt and nut on the left side and throw out all the bolts and nuts, then lower the axle.

Take out the lower block cradle and the gasket. Remove the oil pump bolt and the oil pump. Clean all surfaces of debris, contaminants and old sealant.

Install the New Oil Pump

Apply silicone to the points of connection and line up the lower block cradle and gasket assembly of the new oil pump.

Tighten the outer bolts and nuts, the rear lower block cradle bolts by hand, and the two rear lower block cradle-to-bell housing bolts after installing them. With a straightedge, line up the transmission fact of the lower block cradle with the rear face of the cylinder block.

Torque the outer bolts, the rear lower block cradle bolts and the eight inserts. Put in the two silver-covered bolts and new washer seals and hand-tighten them. Do the same with the six blots left over.

Torque the lower block cradle bolts in stages. In the first stage, torque them to 11 ft-lb. In the second stage, torque them to 25 ft-lb.

Reinstall the parts taken out in Section 1 in the reverse order of how you took them out. Add clean oil to the Ford Explorer engine and start it. Check for leaks.

Items you will need

  • Ramps or lifts

  • Pan for old engine fluids

  • Wrench

  • Special tools

  • New oil pump

  • New engine oil

About the Author

This article was written by the It Still Runs team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Runs, contact us.