How to Change Brake Rotors on an Cars

by Contributing Writer

The brakes on your Acura car are a caliper and rotor design. This design maximizes clamping force and helps to slow the vehicle down quickly. Over time, the rotor thickness will be compromised as the brake pad material is pressed against the rotor's surface. When the rotor becomes excessively scored (you will be able to feel the score marks on the rotor surface), you must change the rotor. You should also change the rotor on your Acura car if you feel any feedback in the steering wheel while braking, as this can indicate uneven contact with the brake pads.

Under The Hood:

 How to Change Brake Rotors on an Acura TL

Loosen the lug nuts on the TL's front wheels by turning them 30 to 45 degrees counterclockwise with a tire wrench.

Raise the TL onto jack stands. Lift up on the Acura TL's front cross member or jack point behind the radiator. Place jack stands under the front pinch welds under the driver's- and passenger-side doors, and lower the TL onto the stands.

Finish removing the wheel lug nuts, and pull the wheel off the wheel hub.

Remove the upper and lower caliper mounting bolts, and slide the caliper off the rotor. Then secure it to the coil springs above it with zip-ties.

Remove the two screws holding the rotor to the wheel hub, using a screwdriver.

Slide the rotor off the wheel hub, and slide the new rotor onto the hub and spray the brake assembly down with brake parts cleaner.

Reassemble the brakes. Assembly is the reverse of disassembly. Tighten the caliper mounting bolts to 53 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

Lower the Acura to the ground, and tighten the lug nuts to 80 foot-pounds with a torque wrench.

Items you will need

  • Tire wrench

  • Jack

  • 2 jack stands

  • Socket wrench

  • Socket set

  • Zip-ties

  • New brake rotors

  • Brake parts cleaner

  • Torque wrench

 How to Replace Brake Rotors on an Isuzu Rodeo

Lift up the front end of the SUV using the jack, and set the vehicle on the jack stands. Be sure the vehicle is solidly set on the stands prior to taking off the front wheels, then unbolt the wheels using the tire iron.

Unbolt the front brake caliper bracket that's attached to the steering knuckle, using the ratchet. Lift it off of the brake disc and support it on the lower control arm of the front suspension. Alternatively, support the brake disc with a metal hook, so that the brake caliper isn't hanging by the brake line.

Slide the factory brake disc off of the front wheel hub and set it aside for recycling, then slide the replacement disc onto the hub.

Reinstall the brake caliper bracket onto the steering knuckle, using the ratchet.

Reinstall the wheels, take the vehicle off the jack stands and set it on the ground, using the jack.

Items you will need

  • Jack

  • Jack stands

  • Tire iron

  • 3/8-inch ratchet and socket set

  • Replacement brake rotors

 How to Change the Brake Rotors on a 2006 Chevrolet Silverado Truck

Removal

Siphon at least two-thirds of the brake fluid out of the brake master cylinder reservoir using a turkey baster, syringe bottle or other siphon tool that has never been used before. Dispose of this fluid as allowed by your local laws,

Raise the truck's front or rear end and support it on jack stands. Remove the wheels.

Compress the brake caliper's pistons back into their bores using a C-clamp. Watch the brake fluid level in the master cylinder reservoir as you compress the piston and siphon out more fluid if necessary to prevent it from overflowing.

Unscrew the brake caliper bolts with a wrench and remove the caliper; hang the caliper from the frame with a strong wire; don't let it hang by the hose.

Pull the brake pads out of the caliper mounting bracket and dispose of them.

Unbolt and remove the caliper mounting bracket using the wrench.

Clip off any pressed washers installed on the wheel studs using cutting pliers. Slide the brake rotor off the hub.

Installation

Slide the replacement brake rotor onto the wheel studs. You will not need to install any replacement washers on the studs if you removed any old ones.

Connect the caliper mounting bracket to the rotor, tightening its mounting bolts to 129 foot pounds (221 foot pounds on models other than the 1500) with a torque wrench.

Install the replacement brake pads into the caliper mounting bracket.

Connect the caliper to the mounting bracket and tighten its mounting bolts with the torque wrench (74 foot pounds on a 1500, 80 for other models).

Reinstall the wheels and lower the truck after changing the rotors that needed replacing.

Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir with fresh DOT 3 brake fluid.

Apply the brake pedal multiple times until it feels firm, re-seating the brake pads against the rotors.

Items you will need

  • Siphon tool

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands

  • Tire iron

  • C-clamp

  • Wrench

  • Strong wire

  • Cutting pliers

  • Brake rotors

  • Brake pads

  • Torque wrench

  • DOT 3 brake fluid

 How to Replace Brake Rotors on a TrailBlazer

Remove the cap from the TrailBlazer's master cylinder.

Raise the front of the TrailBlazer with a jack and secure it on jack stands. Remove the lug nuts from the front wheels with a tire iron then pull off both wheels.

Remove the two bolts on the backside of the brake caliper with a socket and ratchet. The bolts secure the caliper to the brake spindle. Pull the caliper off of the brake rotor.

Pry the center cap off of the rotor with a flat head screwdriver to expose the center hub of the wheel.

Remove the bolt that secures the rotor to the wheel spindle with the socket and ratchet.

Pull the rotor off of the TrailBlazer's wheel spindle.

Tap a new inner wheel bearing onto the back of the brake rotor. Apply bearing grease to the inner bore of the rotor then tap the new outer wheel bearing onto the front of the rotor.

Slide the rotor onto the spindle and secure it with the nut, socket and ratchet.

Remove the old brake pads from the caliper. Squeeze the caliper piston back into the backside of the caliper with a pair of pliers. Place the new pads into the caliper and mount the caliper onto the rotor. Secure the caliper to the brake spindle with the two bolts, socket and ratchet.

Remount the wheel back onto the TrailBlazer's rotor and secure it with the tire iron.

Duplicate the process for the other front brake. Close the master cylinder cap and press on the brake pedal a few times to seat the brake pads against the new rotors.

Items you will need

  • Tire iron

  • Jack

  • Jack stands

  • Socket set

  • Screwdriver

  • Wheel bearings

  • Bearing grease

  • Brake pads

 How to Change the Brake Rotors on a Chevy Blazer

How to Change the Brake Rotors on a Chevy Blazer

Park the Blazer on a flat, level surface. Turn the steering wheel all the way to the right in order to work on the left front wheel and reverse procedure for the right side. Place the Blazer in park and shut the key off.

Place a wheel chock behind one or both rear tires. Using the 1/2 inch drive breaking bar and appropriate sized deep socket, crack the lug nuts loose. Lift the vehicle with a floor jack and place a jack stand under the bottom control arm below the shock absorber.

Squeeze the piston of the caliper in by placing the large screwdriver or medium angle pry bar in between the rotor and the caliper. Do this slowly until the caliper has movement on the slides. Squeeze it in as far as you can.

Remove caliper bolts using 3/8 inch socket and 3/8 inch hex head socket or 3/8 inch Allen wrench. Place caliper up on top of upper control arm and rest on upper ball joint.

Remove caliper bridge bolts using the breaking bar and appropriate sized 1/2 inch drive socket.

Remove the old rotor. If this does not come loose on the hub, you may have to hammer the rotor off, being careful not to hit the fender well. Hit the exposed area of the rotor from behind and in front.

Clean the hub as best you can with a medium grade sandpaper. Try to clean most of any present rust along the edge of the hub and on the face of the hub by lug studs.

Clean the new rotor with canned brake clean and a shop rag to remove rust preventive coating. Be liberal and clean thoroughly.

Place the new rotor on the hub. Replace the caliper bridge and tighten as tight as you can with the breaking bar.

Replace the caliper over the rotor and be sure you do not twist the brake hose incorrectly. If the caliper does not go on, you may need to remove the pads and squeeze the piston in further with a C-clamp or a large pair of channel locks. Do not force it on if it does not fit easily. Tighten.

Replace the tire and tighten lug nuts as tight as you can get them with the wheel raised. Remove the jack stand and lower vehicle and torque the lug nuts to 100 foot pounds in an alternate sequence.

Repeat this procedure for the other side.

Pump up the brake pedal to restore hydraulic pressure to the caliper pistons. Remove the wheel chock and test drive the car.

Items you will need

  • 1/2 inch drive breaking bar

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stand

  • Wheel chock

  • Variety of 1/2 inch drive deep sockets

  • 3/8 inch drive, 3/8 inch hex head socket or 3/8 inch Allen wrench

  • 3/8 inch ratchet (to use with 3/8 inch hex head socket

  • Large straight edged screwdriver or medium angled pry bar

  • Hammer

  • Medium grade sandpaper

  • Canned brake clean

  • Shop rag

  • C-clamp or large pair of channel locks

  • 1/2 inch drive adjustable torque wrench

 How to Change Brake Rotors on a 1998 Honda Civic

Apply the Civic’s emergency brake, then use a lug wrench the slightly loosen the lug nuts on the front driver’s side tire.

Raise the car seven inches from the ground with a suitable car jack. Slide a jack stand into position, on the right of the car jack, to help support the weight of the car. Remove the lug nuts from the tire and slide the tire off the hub, using both hands. Roll the tire to the side of your work area and place all of its lug nuts in a small cup, for safe keeping.

Place an 8-inch C-clamp around the body of the brake caliper. Wind the C-clamp shut until the piston at the rear of the inner brake pad is forced down into its bore hole. Do not over-tighten the C-clamp. Once you see that the piston appears level with its opening in the bore hole, stop winding and remove the C-clamp.

Remove the two bolts that hold the caliper bracket in place with a socket wrench. (You do not need to take out the brake caliper’s retaining bolts--just the two bracket bolts closest to the inner side of the hub.)

Straighten a wire coat hanger and then wrap it around the spring where your shocks are located. Slide the caliper and bracket off the rotor. Hang the assembly from the coat hanger using one of the available bolt holes. Do not hang the caliper and bracket from the brake line, because their weight will damage the brake line.

Remove the two screws that hold the rotor onto the hub, using a Phillips screwdriver, then slide the rotor off the hub with an outward motion.

Install the new rotor by reversing the removal steps. Tighten the caliper bracket bolts with a 3/8-inch-drive torque wrench set to 80 ft-lbs; tighten the tire’s lug nuts. Pump the brake pedal until you feel it firm up. Follow the preceding steps to change the remaining rotors.

Items you will need

  • Lug wrench

  • Car jack

  • Jack stand

  • 8-inch C-clamp

  • Socket wrench set

  • Wire coat hanger

  • Phillips screwdriver

  • 3/8-inch-drive torque wrench

 How to Replace Brake Rotors on a Toyota Avalon

Park the Avalon on a flat, paved surface. Use a floor jack to raise the car and secure it on jack stands.

Remove the lug nuts from the wheel you will be working on with a lug wrench then pull off the wheel and set it aside. If you have difficulty removing the lug nuts, use an impact wrench.

Remove the bolts securing the brake caliper to the brake caliper bracket with a metric wrench. Remove the brake caliper from the brake rotor by pulling the caliper away from the caliper bracket. Use a piece of wire to secure the brake caliper to the car, reducing tension on the brake line. Remove the brake pads from the brake caliper bracket.

Loosen and remove the bolts holding the brake caliper bracket to the car with a metric wrench, ratchet and socket. Remove the brake caliper bracket and set it aside.

Pull the brake caliper towards you and remove it from the wheel hub.

Install the new brake rotor onto the hub and tighten a single lug nut by hand to secure it in the proper position.

Reattach the brake caliper bracket to the wheel hub and secure it with its bolts. Use a torque wrench and socket to tighten the bolts to the manufacturer's specified torque. Insert the brake pads into the brake pad caliper bracket.

Remove the wire holding the brake caliper to the vehicle. Insert a brake pad spreader tool to compress the brake pistons into the caliper assembly. Place the brake caliper into the brake caliper bracket and insert the bolts. Use the torque wrench to tighten the caliper bolts to the manufacturer's recommended specification.

Loosen and remove the lug nut for the brake rotor. Remount the wheel onto the hub and tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Perform Steps 2 through 9 for each brake rotor requiring replacement.

Raise the vehicle with the floor jack, remove the jack stands and lower the vehicle to the ground. Tighten the lug nuts to 90 ft.-lbs. of torque with the torque wrench and a socket.

Items you will need

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands

  • Lug wrench

  • Impact wrench

  • Metric wrenches

  • Wire

  • Ratchet

  • Torque wrench

  • Brake caliper spreader tool

  • Metric sockets

 How to Change the Brake Rotors on a Toyota Corolla

Park the car on a level surface. If you are changing all four rotors and brake pads, then you will need two sets of jack stands. However, if you are only doing the front or the back, then it is advisable to place wood blocks behind the wheels that will remain on the ground to prevent any rollbacks while working on the Corolla. Usually brake pads and rotors wear out more quickly on the front than the back.

Place a floor jack underneath the frame of the Corolla about 6 inches to a foot back from the tire. Lift the driver's side of the Corolla with the floor jack, making sure that the front tire is elevated off the ground at least 4 inches or more. Secure the car in place by inserting a jack stand underneath the frame. Slowly release the floor jack and repeat the same process for the passenger side of the car. Before proceeding, make sure that the jack stands are both centered under the frame and are level on the ground.

Remove both wheels with a lug nut socket wrench. Set the lug nuts aside, face up, so that they do not get dirt inside of them.

Disconnect the bolts for the brake caliper, which are found behind the wheel hub. Remove the brake pads and shims from the caliper once it is removed.

Use a C-clamp to push the caliper piston back into the caliper body to allow space to reinsert the brake pads into the caliper. If the C-clamp will not work, you may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to rotate the piston clockwise to retract it into the caliper body. Different caliper designs will have different pistons. Since the Corolla has been manufactured for several years, there will be different designs according to your particular model-year.

Use a socket or torque wrench to disconnect the brake caliper mounting bolts. This will give you access to the rotors.

Remove the retaining screw from the rotor's disc mounting hole. This is the final piece that must be removed before the rotor can be replaced. Slide the rotor off the wheel hub. If it is jammed, you may need to tap it gently with a mallet in order to release it from rust between the rotor and the bearing hub.

Use both hands to hold the rotor and slide it gently along the wheel until it is secured against the bearing hub. Screw in the retaining screw. Bolt the brake caliper mount back into place.

Install the new brake pad back into the caliper assembly. If the pads do not fit due to the caliper piston sticking out too much, you may need to depress it back into place with a C-clamp. Use a torque wrench set between 16 and 23 foot-pounds to bolt the caliper assembly back onto the mounting bracket.

Bolt the wheels back into place and carefully lower the car. You will need to pump the brakes a couple of times, also called bleeding the brakes, to make sure that the brake fluid reaches the braking system.

Items you will need

  • Wheel chocks

  • Torque wrench

  • Replacement brakes

  • Tire iron

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands

  • C-clamp

  • Needle-nose pliers (optional)

  • Rubber mallet (optional)

  • Silicone-based grease

  • Replacement brake pad springs

  • Socket wrench and adapters

 How to Change Brake Rotors on a Toyota Avalon

Park the Avalon on a flat paved surface. Apply the parking brake and release the hood latch. Place a wheel chock behind one rear tire, open the hood and remove half of the brake fluid from the master cylinder reservoir using the turkey baster. Discard the fluid appropriately and do not reuse. Replace the master cylinder cap securely.

Break the lug nuts loose on the front tires with the breaking bar and a 21 millimeter socket.

Lift the front of the Avalon with the floor jack and place a jack stand under the left and right front frame rails. Remove the lug nuts and wheels.

Compress the piston of the left front caliper using the pry bar wedged between the caliper porthole in the front and the rotor. Compress the piston until it bottoms out inside the caliper.

Remove the caliper bridge bolts on the left caliper using the ratchet and a socket. Pry the caliper and bridge off of the rotor as an attached unit and support it to the coil spring using a bungee cord.

Remove the rotor. If the rotor does not come off of the hub, put on the safety glasses and strike the rotor with the hammer on the flat end of the fins. Strike it both inward and outward until it breaks free from the hub.

Repeat steps 4, 5 and 6 for the right side.

Spray the new rotors with brake cleaner liberally and wipe them dry with a shop rag. Be sure to spray both side of the rotors inside the hub and everywhere.

Place the new rotor(s) onto the wheel hub and replace the caliper and bridge over the new rotor. Line up the caliper bridge bolts to the holes in the knuckle and tighten securely with the ratchet and a socket. Repeat step for the other side.

Replace the wheels and lug nuts. Tighten snug and lower the Avalon to the ground. Re-tighten the lug nuts with the adjustable torque wrench set to 80 foot pounds.

Remove the wheel chock.

Release the parking brake and pump the foot brake pedal to restore hydraulic pressure into the compressed caliper pistons. Failure to perform this step will be hazardous. Check and adjust the brake fluid level in the master cylinder only adding new DOT 3 brake fluid. Take a test drive.

Items you will need

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stands (2)

  • Wheel chock

  • 1/2 inch drive breaking bar

  • 1/2 inch drive metric socket set (up to 21 millimeter)

  • 1/2 inch drive ratchet

  • Turkey baster

  • DOT 3 brake fluid

  • 1/2 inch drive adjustable torque wrench

  • Bungee cord

  • Small/medium pry bar

  • Ball peen hammer

  • Safety glasses

  • Brake cleaner spray

  • Shop rags

 How to Replace the Brake Rotors on a Subaru Forester

Park the Forester on a level paved or concrete surface. Apply the parking brake. Place the wheel chock behind one rear wheel.

Break the lug nuts loose on the left front tire. Lift the left front quarter with the floor jack and place the jack stand in a secure and safe location to support the vehicle.

Remove the lug nuts and the wheel.

Locate the two caliper bolts on the inside of the caliper and remove them with the ratchet and socket. Pry the caliper off the bridge using a large straight-edged screwdriver or leverage. Support the caliper on the upper control arm. Do not let it dangle by its brake hose.

Remove the pads from the bridge, but pay attention to how they are positioned in the bridge so you can replace them in the exact same way (unless you're replacing the pads as well). Use the screwdriver to assist you in prying the pads from the caliper bridge.

Locate the caliper bridge bolts on the back side of the wheel hub and remove them with the 1/2-inch breaking bar and socket. You can switch over to the ratchet when the bolts are loose, but they'll be very tight at first so the breaking bar will break them loose easily.

Remove the rotors. This may require you to shock them off the hub using a hammer and striking them on the fins repeatedly.

Spray the new rotors with brake clean spray to clean off the rust-preventive coating, and wipe them dry with a shop rag.

Install the new rotors on the hub.

Replace the bridge and tighten very tightly with the ratchet and again a half turn with the breaking bar.

Replace the pads in the bridge. If you're replacing with new pads, place a small amount of the supplied silicone lubricant to the contact points on the bridge.

Squeeze the piston of the caliper all the way in as far as it will go with a C-clamp.

Place the caliper over the rotor and caliper bridge, replace the caliper bolts, and tighten.

Replace the tire and lug nuts. Tighten the lug nuts flush to the hub and lower the vehicle. Re-tighten the lug nuts using the 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and a socket (65 to 80 foot-pounds).

Repeat the procedure for the right side.

Pump the foot brake pedal to restore the hydraulic pressure back into the caliper pistons. Do not forget this step as you will have no braking response until the pistons are hydraulically restored. Four of five pumps of the foot brake should restore the pistons, but pump until the brake pedal feels normal. Release the hood latch and check and adjust the brake fluid in the master cylinder if you need to.

Remove the wheel chock and test drive the car in a safe area.

Items you will need

  • Floor jack Jack stand Wheel chock 1/2-inch drive breaking bar 1/2-drive ratchet 1/2-inch drive metric socket set Large straight edge screwdriver Hammer C-clamp Brake clean spray Shop rag 1/2-inch drive adjustable torque wrench

 How to Replace the Brake Rotors on a Saturn L-300

Removing the Brake Rotor

Loosen the lug nuts on the wheel assembly you are going to service using a lug wrench.

Lift the wheel/tire assembly off the ground you need to service using a floor jack and support the suspension with a jack stand under the frame. Block the rest of the wheels/tire assemblies with wheel chocks.

Remove the wheel assembly from the hub and rotor you are going to service.

Follow the brake hose connected to the brake caliper where it hooks to the strut. The caliper is the component with the brake pads and is mounted on one side over the brake rotor.

Pull off the locking plate that secures the caliper brake hose to the strut using a pair of needle-nose pliers and pull the brake hose off the strut clip router. If you are servicing a rear rotor, the brake hose is secured to the rear axle control arm with a single bolt that you can unfasten with a ratchet and socket.

Locate the two brake caliper mounting bolts behind the caliper and unfasten the caliper bolts with a ratchet and socket. Pull the caliper off the brake rotor and secure it to any suspension component with heavy wire to prevent damage to the brake hose. If you are servicing a rear rotor, first drive out the two pins on top of the caliper from the outside to the inside with a thin Phillips screwdriver. After removing the two pins, remove the spring on top of the brake pads inside the caliper and the two brake pads. Keep the pins and pads organized so that you reinstall the components in their original locations.

Unfasten and remove the single brake rotor mounting bolt from the front of the rotor using a Torx bit and a ratchet and remove the rotor from the hub assembly.

Installing the New Brake Rotor

Spray brake parts cleaner around the hub and brake assembly to wipe the assembly clean of brake dust and grease using lint-free paper towels. Also, spray the friction surfaces of the new brake rotor with brake parts cleaner and wipe it clean with lint-free paper towels to remove the protective film.

Place the new brake rotor in position on the hub assembly and tighten the rotor mounting bolt to 3 foot-pounds (4 Nm) using the Torx bit and a torque wrench.

Put the brake caliper in position over the brake rotor. Clean the two caliper mounting bolts with brake parts cleaner and apply Loctite 272 thread locker or equivalent to the bolts' threads and tighten the bolts to 70 foot-pounds (95 Nm) using the torque wrench and socket. If you are servicing a rear rotor, replace the brake pads, spring and drive in the two pins from the inside to the outside of the caliper with light taps using a hammer.

Secure the caliper brake hose to the strut installing the locking plate using the needle-nose pliers. If you are servicing a rear rotor, secure the brake hose to the rear axle control arm and tighten the bolt with the ratchet and socket.

Replace the wheel assembly and partially tighten the lug nuts with the lug wrench. Repeat the brake pad replacement on the opposite wheel.

Lower the car using the floor jack and tighten the lug nuts to 46 foot-pounds (63 Nm) on the first pass and then to 92 foot-pounds (125 Nm) on the second pass, using the torque wrench and a socket.

Items you will need

  • Lug wrench

  • Floor jack

  • Jack stand

  • 3 wheel chocks

  • Needle-nose pliers

  • Ratchet

  • Socket

  • Heavy wire

  • Thin Phillips screwdriver, if necessary

  • Torx bit

  • Brake parts cleaner

  • Lint-free paper towels

  • Torque wrench

  • Loctite 272 thread locker or equivalent

  • Hammer, if necessary

 How to Replace Brake Rotors on a Suburban

How to Replace Brake Rotors on a Suburban

Place the Suburban safely and securely onto a car lift. Before lifting, release the hood latch and remove the master cylinder cover. Remove 2/3 of the brake fluid from the master cylinder by sucking it out with a brake fluid siphon. Replace the cover.

Lift the Suburban to a comfortable height to work on the brakes (waist level). Remove the hub caps and then remove the lug nuts using the impact gun and a socket. Remove the wheels.

Remove the front wheel hub extension if applicable (dual rear wheel models). Insert the screwdriver or pry bar through the caliper port and into one of the brake rotor vents to prevent it from moving. Make a mark with a tire crayon on one of the lug studs and also on the wheel hub extension to establish the relationship between the the extension and its position on the hub. When it comes time to replace the hub extension, it is strongly suggested to put it on the hub in the same position in which it was removed. Marking the hub and the stud will ensure you are replacing it in that fashion. Remove the extension bolts with the gun and a socket and then remove the extension. Tap it with a rubber mallet if necessary to break it free from the hub. If a wheel hub extension is not present, skip this step and proceed to step 4.

Insert the large screwdriver or pry bar into the front open port of the caliper and pry the edge of the rotor against the caliper piston. This will compress the piston of the caliper enough to remove it from the knuckle. Pry the rotor inward slowly and as far as it will allow you to. The replacement rotor will be thicker than the existing one so more room will be necessary when you're ready to reinstall the caliper onto the new rotor.

Remove the caliper assembly by removing the two caliper assembly bolts with the impact gun and socket. A swivel may be required to properly seat the socket onto the caliper assembly bolts. Remove the caliper assembly and secure it with mechanic's wire to a front-end component so it does not hang by the hydraulic caliper hose.

Remove the rotor. If necessary, spray penetrating oil into the two threaded holes in the front hub face of the rotor. Insert the two 10x1.5 millimeter bolts into the holes and then tighten them alternately with the ratchet and a socket to draw the rotor from the hub. Remove the bolts to reuse on the other rotor if desired.

Clean the surface of the hub using an angled die grinder and reconditioning disc. Be sure to wear safety glasses before attempting this. Clean the face of the hub and the edges (that the replacement rotors will contact) of the hub so that they're free of burrs, rust, and corrosion build-up with the die grinder.

Clean off the oily residue on the replacement rotors by spraying on brake clean solvent. Install the new rotor onto the hub. If applicable, replace the wheel hub extension and bolts.

Replace the caliper assembly and bolts.

Replace the wheel and lug nuts. Be sure to torque the lug nuts per proper torque specifications of the particular Suburban year and model you're working on. Replace the hub cap.

Repeat steps 3 through 10 for the other rotor.

Lower the Suburban to the ground and pump the foot brake pedal to seat the pads against the new rotors. Check and add brake fluid to the master cylinder.

Items you will need

  • Car lift (side-by style to suspend the wheels)

  • Safety glasses

  • 1/2 inch drive impact gun

  • 1/2 inch drive impact socket set

  • 1/2 inch drive impact universal swivel

  • 1/2 inch drive ratchet

  • Penetrating oil

  • 10 millimeter (size) by 1.5 millimeter (thread pitch) bolts (2)

  • Angled die grinder and coarse reconditioning discs

  • Brake clean solvent

  • Large straightedge screwdriver or medium pry bar

  • Mechanic's wire

  • Brake fluid

  • Brake fluid siphon

  • Tire crayon

  • Rubber mallet

  • Replacement rotors