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How to Hook Up an Engine Hoist for Engine Removal

by Russell Wood

Engine hoists are used by mechanics to remove the engine from a vehicle. These hoists are designed to lift engines of varying sizes and weights, so they have different settings to ensure the most flexibility for the product. There are hundreds of different types and sizes of engines, so there are many different ways to remove the engine from the vehicle using the hoist. If you know a few basic tips, however, then you can hoist any engine from a vehicle.

Open the hood on the vehicle. Locate the top of the engine and find the approximate middle point of the engine. Drape the chains across this middle point, forming an "X" shape with the chains.

Locate a bolt on the engine that can be removed, such as one on the intake manifold, exhaust manifolds or similar bolt. This bolt also should be located next to the end of one of the lengths of chain. Unbolt the bolt using an open-end wrench or the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket.

Place the chain between the bolt and the object it was bolted to, then reinstall the bolt with the ratchet or wrench. Repeat this process for the other points on the chains until each length of chain is bolted across the engine on two points.

Look at the end of the engine hoist where the hook meets the arm. Look for weight markings on the size of the hoist, which show what weight setting the hoist is capable of lifting when the arm is set at that point. Unbolt the hoist arm with the 3/8-inch ratchet and socket and an open-end wrench, then slide the arm in and out of the hoist and reinstall the bolt at the weight setting appropriate for your engine.

Attach the hook on the arm of the engine hoist to the approximate middle of the engine, sliding the chains into the hook until the hoist is connected to the chain.

Tip

  • If you don't know the weight of your engine, always approximate low. Most V8 engines are fairly heavy and aluminum engines are lighter, but always err on the side of caution.

Items you will need

About the Author

Russell Wood is a writer and photographer who attended Arizona State University. He has been building custom cars and trucks since 1994, including several cover vehicles. In 2000 Wood started a career as a writer, and since then he has dedicated his business to writing and photographing cars and trucks, as well as helping people learn more about how vehicles work.

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