Ford Explorer Ignition Problems

by Horacio Garcia

Determining the ignition problems with a Ford Explorer is a step-by-step process, but if a person is not mechanically inclined it is best that the Explorer be taken to a qualified Ford technician. The Ford Explorer starting problems can be caused by other components besides the ignition module or coil. Once the battery and starter have been checked and determined to be in good condition, then the ignition switch, module or coil need attention.

Ignition Switch Corroded

The Ford Explorer has an ignition switch that signals the starter to turn the engine over when the key is turned on the column of the vehicle. The switch can become corroded over time, creating an interrupted signal in the ignition switch. The steering column and ignition switch becomes hot to the touch when this corrosion problem occurs. The Explorer may occasionally start when this corrosion begins to occur, but replacing the ignition switch is the only way to ensure that this corroding problem on the ignition switch is corrected.

Broken Ignition Wire

The ignition wires going to the starter in a Ford Explorer are located close to high temperatures when the vehicle is running. The wires can slowly begin to melt because of the heat generated from the engine. This melting of the insulation around the ignition wires causes some of the wires to break on the ignition, creating Ford Explorer ignition problems. The breaking of the ignition wire can develop over time, and the operator will experience minor or intermittent starting problems until the wires break completely. Changing the wiring harness that runs from the ignition switch and starting unit is the only cure for this ignition problem.

Loose Connection

The wiring harness of the ignition of a Ford Explorer is attached by male and female plugs on the ends of the wiring harness. One or more of these plugs of the wiring harness can come loose and create Ford Explorer ignition problems. The operator or owner of the Explorer can open the hood of the vehicle and check the connections of the wiring harness. The operator does have to crawl under the vehicle to check the connections to the starter because it is located on the driver's side of the engine compartment on the underside of the engine.

About the Author

Horacio Garcia has been writing since 1979, beginning his career as the spokesperson for Trinity Broadcast Network. Within 10 years Garcia was being called upon to write speeches and scripts for several state and federal congressmen, local broadcast networks and publications such as "Readers Digest." He received his bachelor's degree in public relations from Argosy University.

Photo Credits

  • photo_camera red truck front view on metal background image by patrimonio designs from Fotolia.com