How to Fix a Sunroof on a Neon

by David Montoya
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A sunroof is an extra commodity most car owners would love to have. The extra sunlight and fresh air can greatly enhance the driving experience. Unfortunately, sunroofs can also create problems if they start to malfunction. They have a tendency to get stuck in one position or spring a leak, both annoying and potentially damaging situations. Fortunately, sunroofs are simple devices that you can repair on your own with relative ease. This true for most cars, including the Dodge Neon.

Fixing a Jammed Sunroof

Step 1

Inspect the sunroof from the top of the hood for any dirt, debris, pebbles or other foreign materials that may be keeping the sunroof from sliding properly.

Step 2

Remove all large pieces of debris that you can find.

Step 3

Wash the outside of the sunroof with mild soap and warm water. Use a clean rag to wash away any remaining dirt or grime.

Completely dry off the sunroof and try to open it again. It should slide open easily if it was obstructed by dirt or other objects.

Fixing a Leak

Step 1

Pour a small amount of water over the sunroof with a hose, bucket or cup. The exact location of a sunroof leak is usually difficult to spot unless you can watch the leak form.

Step 2

Replace the outside rubber seal if you see water leaking underneath it. Check to see if any visual signs, such as a brittle or dry rubber seal surrounding the sunroof, point to an obvious problem. If you don't notice any major damage (i.e. a small amount of cracking), you can seal the trouble spots with a small amount of silicone sealant.

Step 3

Inspect the drainage tubes if water seems to overflow. You can clean out the tubes with any long tool such as a screwdriver. Check the ends of the drainage tubes for blockages. Leaks near the fixing points can also be stopped with an application of silicone sealant.

See your local mechanic or sunroof manufacturer if problems persist. You may need a whole new sunroof if there is extensive damage to our current one.

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