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DIY: Oil Change for a 2006 Audi A3

by Don Bowman

Changing the oil on your 2006 Audi A3 will save you a considerable amount of money, and it is not a difficult procedure to complete. The engine holds 4.5 quarts of synthetic oil and has a paper filter. Audi recommends 10/40 weight oil, and the brand is up to your discretion. Due to the size of the drain plug and location of the filter, a large oil drain pan is necessary to prevent an oil spill on your driveway.

Start the engine and allow it to run for five minutes in order to make the oil warm enough to drain completely. Shut the engine off. Raise the car, one side at a time, on the sub-frame just behind the front wheels, using the floor jack.

Place a jack stand on each side, directly behind the floor jack. Lower the car onto the stands. Remove the metal engine cover bolts, using a socket -- the bolts are located under the front of the car. Lower the cover and move it aside.

Place the drain pan under the drain plug, located toward the rear of the engine oil pan. Remove the plug, using a 19 mm wrench. Allow the oil to drain into the pan for 15 minutes. Install the drain plug and tighten it snugly.

Loosen the oil filter housing, using the strap wrench, and spin it off the rest of the way by hand. Get ready for a rush of oil as the housing is removed. Pull the paper filter out of the housing and replace with a new filter and O-ring that comes with the filter. Spread a light coat of oil on the new O-ring. Wipe the housing clean with a cloth.

Thread the oil filter housing clockwise to tighten it. Tighten the housing by hand only, or it will be hard to remove next time. Install the metal engine cover under the front of the car and tighten all the bolts securely.

Raise each side of the car, remove the jack stands and lower the car. Fill the engine with 4.5 quarts of oil. Start the engine and let it idle for one minute. Turn it off and wait two minutes. Check the dipstick to make sure it is up to the "Full" mark.

Items you will need

About the Author

Don Bowman has been writing for various websites and several online magazines since 2008. He has owned an auto service facility since 1982 and has over 45 years of technical experience as a master ASE tech. Bowman has a business degree from Pennsylvania State University and was an officer in the U.S. Army (aircraft maintenance officer, pilot, six Air Medal awards, two tours Vietnam).

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