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How to Check the Automatic Transmission Fluid of a 2010 Honda Civic

by Justin Cupler

In 2006, Honda totally changed the look of the Civic, eliminating its typically conservative look for an ultra-modern appearance. Only the 1992 redesign, which eliminated the boxy look in favor of the rounded body, rivaled the drastic 2006 redesign. The 2010 Civic came standard with a five-speed manual transmission, but had a five-speed automatic transmission available. Checking the automatic transmission's fluid level is an important process, as running low on fluid may cause severe damage to the transmission.

Checking the Automatic Transmission Fluid

Park the Civic on a level surface and open the hood. Leave the vehicle running and listen for the radiator fan to turn on --- this indicates the vehicle has reached operating temperature.

Turn the engine off. Wait for at least 60 seconds, but no more than 90 seconds and remove the transmission dipstick --- the yellow-handled stick between the air intake tube and the battery.

Wipe the old oil off the dipstick, using a clean, lint-free cloth, and reinsert the dipstick. Remove the dipstick again and check the transmission fluid level on the end of the dipstick. The correct fluid level on the 2010 Civic is between the upper and lower marks on the end of the dipstick.

Adding Transmission Fluid

Remove the dipstick and insert a funnel into the dipstick hole.

Add Honda Genuine ATF-Z1 transmission fluid through the funnel and recheck the transmission fluid following the process outlined in the section titled "Checking the Automatic Transmission Fluid."

Repeat Step 2 until the transmission level is between the upper and lower marks on the transmission dipstick.

Items you will need

About the Author

Justin Cupler is a professional writer who has been published on several websites including CarsDirect and Autos.com. Cupler has worked in the professional automotive repair field as a technician and a manager since 2000. He has a certificate in broadcast journalism from the Connecticut School of Broadcasting. Cupler is currently studying mechanical engineering at Saint Petersburg College.

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