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What Causes Vibrating in a Truck's Rear End?

by Brenda Priddy

Trucks sometimes develop problems due to rough terrain, the way they are driven and other random factors. One problem that occurs is rear-end vibration. This vibration is usually caused by a problem with the wheels or tires of the vehicle. Most vibration issues are simple an inexpensive to address, but most also require the assistance of a certified mechanic to prevent injuries and for maximum safety when using the vehicle after adjustment.

Balance

One of the main problems that can occur with the rear end of a truck is balance problems. When the truck is driven over uneven ground or on roads with potholes, the alignment of the tires is altered. This can cause the truck to vibrate and shake in the back end if the truck's back axle is misaligned. The best way to fix this problem is to take the car in for realignment at a mechanic's shop or at the vehicle dealer.

Wheels

The wheels themselves can also cause vibrations in a truck's rear end. The wheels are made with slightly different shapes. Not all wheels are perfectly round. The bigger the difference between the shape of the front wheels and the back wheels, the more vibrations will occur in the back of the vehicle. The only way to fix this is to replace the wheels on the back of the truck or to switch the placement of the wheels so that the uneven wheels are spaced throughout the vehicle.

Tires

Uneven tire wear can also cause rear-end vibrations. Over time, the truck will wear the tires differently. This happens with all vehicles. When you rotate the tires, a tire that wore differently could cause the rear end of the truck to vibrate. This problem will go away on its own after a few weeks of driving and is not a serious problem.

Axle Bearing

Another cause for rear-end wheel vibrations is axle bearing failure. The axle bearings hold the weight of the wheel against the axle and prevent the two metals from touching. When the axle bearing breaks, the two metals rub against each other, causing severe vibrations in that wheel.

About the Author

Brenda Priddy has more than 10 years of crafting and design experience, as well as more than six years of professional writing experience. Her work appears in online publications such as Donna Rae at Home, Five Minutes for Going Green and Daily Mayo. Priddy also writes for Archstone Business Solutions and holds an Associate of Arts in English from McLennan Community College.

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