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My 2006 Ford 500 Won't Start

by Dan Swords

Troubleshooting a Ford Five Hundred that won't start begins with one of two symptoms: the engine does not crank or the engine cranks but does not start. The first symptom usually indicates a problem in the electrical system while the second symptom indicates a problem in the air, fuel or timing of the engine. Seek a qualified service technician if you do not feel confident in making these repairs yourself.

Troubleshooting an engine that does not crank

Check the battery voltage with your DVM.
1

Check the battery connection to verify that they are secure to the terminal posts. The battery posts and connectors should be free from damage, corrosion, dirt and oil. Measure the voltage across the battery terminals. The voltage should be approximately 12 volts.

2

Turn the key switch on and measure the voltage across the starter solenoid. The voltage should be approximately 12 volts. If the voltage is 12 volts there is a problem with starter solenoid. If the voltage is less than 8 volts there is a problem with the start relay.

3

Follow the wires back from the starter solenoid to the starter relay on the firewall. Turn the keyswitch on and measure the voltage across the relay coil. The voltage should be approximately 12 volts. If the voltage is 12 volts, there is a problem with the starter relay. If the voltage is less than 8 volts, there is a problem in the keyswitch ciruit.

Troubleshooting an engine that cranks but does not start

1

Open the hood and locate the rectangle box above the air intake system. Remove the top cover and remove the air filter. Verify that the filter is not dirty or clogged. A dirty or clogged filter will limit the amount of air going to the cylinder. Replace as needed.

2

Turn the key switch "Off". Remove the fuel pump relay from the fuse/relay box, refer to Owner's Manual link in the References section below. Turn the key to "Start" and try to start the engine several times. Remove the fuel filter from the underside of the chassis. Inspect the filter to see if it is dirty or clogged. A dirty filter will limit the amount of fuel going into the cylinder. If necessary, replace the filter.

3

Turn the key switch "On" and listen for the fuel pump to turn on. An audible "hum" can be heard when the fuel pump is running. If you do not hear a hum, check the wiring to the fuel pump. Verify that the connections are tight and free of corrosion, abrasion or incorrect attachment. Repair as required. A faulty fuel pump will limit the amount of fuel sent to the cylinders. Have a qualified service technician look at the fuel system. The technician may have to connect an electronic service tool to the engine to monitor the actual fuel delivery, sensors and electronic control module.

Items you will need

About the Author

Dan Swords has been a technical writer since 1991. He specializes in computer and electronic topics and earned an Associates In Applied Science in electronic engineering technology from Illinois Central College and is furthering his education with classes in computer science and culinary arts.

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  • dead battery image by Katrina Miller from Fotolia.com