1991 Ford F-250 Specs

by Justin Cupler

Ford began using the F-series name back in 1948 when it released the F-1, F-2 and F-3: 1/2-ton, 3/4-ton and heavy-duty, respectively. In 1953, Ford changed the truck to—the more modern— F-100, F-250 and F-350. The F-250, formerly the F-2, has always been and still remains Ford's 3/4-ton pickup. The 1991 F-250 has many drivetrain and body options, giving it appeal to nearly any truck buyer at the time.

Drivetrain

The 1991 F-250 had four engine options—three gasoline and one diesel. For gasoline engines, Ford offered a 4.9-liter inline six-cylinder (I6) producing 150 horsepower and 260 ft-lbs of torque, a 4.9-liter V8, sometimes referred to as a 5-liter, producing 185 horsepower and 270 ft-lbs of torque and a 5.8-liter V8 producing 200 horsepower and 310 ft-lbs of torque. The single diesel option—a 7.3-liter V8—produced 180 horsepower and 380 ft-lbs of torque. The F-250 came in two- and four-wheel-drive models.

Interior

The F-250 came in either a regular cab or a Super Cab, with which rear seating was available. In the front, the F-250 had 40 to 40.3 inches of headroom, 41.1 inches of legroom, 65.3 inches of shoulder room, 61.2 inches of hip room. In the rear, when equipped with seats, it had 39.2 inches of headroom, 28.5 inches of legroom, 67.4 inches of shoulder room and 61.1 inches of hip room.

Exterior

Because of the different cab sizes and drive trains, the exterior dimensions of the 1991 F-250 vary. It had a length of 210.2 to 232.2 inches, a width of 79 inches, a height of 73.4 to 76.5 inches and a 133 to 155 inch wheelbase. The curb weight—weight without passengers or cargo—ranged from 4,208 pounds to 5,138 pounds.

Fuel

The fuel economy of the F-250 ranged greatly depending on options selected. The 4.9 liter got 13 to 15 mpg in the city and 17 to 19 mpg on the highway. The 4.9 liter got 11 to 12 mpg in the city and 12 to 16 mpg on the highway. The 5.8 liter got 10 to 11 mpg in the city and 15 mpg on the highway. The 7.3-liter diesel was not tested for fuel economy. All 1991 F-250s came equipped with a 37.2-gallon fuel tanks.

About the Author

Justin Cupler is a professional writer who has been published on several websites including CarsDirect and Autos.com. Cupler has worked in the professional automotive repair field as a technician and a manager since 2000. He has a certificate in broadcast journalism from the Connecticut School of Broadcasting. Cupler is currently studying mechanical engineering at Saint Petersburg College.